Jorge Lewinski

13 April to 21 May 1972

Press Notice

This is the first in a projected series of occasional exhibitions to be organised by the Gallery’s new Department of Film and Photography. It will include a selection from Mr Lewinski’s almost complete set of portraits of British artists, among them David Hockney, Elisabeth Frink, Gerald Scarfe, Barabra Hepworth and Francis Bacon, and personalities as diverse as Diana Rigg, Cleo Laine, Elizabeth Lutyens and Ann Jones. Mr Lewinski is Senior Lecturer at the London College of Printing and a well known contributor to newspapers and magazines. 

Handlist

1. David Hockney, September 1969

2. Ivon Hitchens, September 1969

3. Dame Barbara Hepworth, November 1969
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4. Stevie Smith, July 1965

5. Bridget Riley, July 1971

6. Elisabeth Frink, October 1967

7. Henry Moore, October 1967

8. Lord Attlee, January 1966
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9. Vanessa Redgrave, June 1967
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10. Brigid Brophy, May 1969
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11. Cleo Laine, January 1970
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12. Ann Jones, July 1968
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13. Geraldine McEwan, June 1970

14. Diana Rigg, September 1967
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15. Dame Peggy Ashcroft, September 1966
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16. Thorold Dickinson, February 1972
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17. Francis Bacon, October 1971

18. Frank Auerbach, September 1965
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19. Joan Sutherland, August 1968
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20. Dame Marie Rambert, July 1965
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21. Anthony Caro, May 1969

22. Joe Tilson, March 1972
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23. Marcel Duchamp, June 1966

24. Bernard Leach, May 1970
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25. Dame Rebecca West, September 1966
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26. Graham Sutherland, August 1966
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27. Professor Dorothy Hodgkin, July 1965

28. Elisabeth Lutyens, November 1968

29. Professor Kathleen Kenyon, September 1969

30. John Piper, May 1969

31. L.S. Lowry, December 1964

32. Gerald Scarfe, July 1967
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33. Patrick Heron, May 1965

Press Reviews

‘Lewinski’s way with strong-natured English women is really something to see.’

John Russell, ‘Objects of Magic’ in The Sunday Times, 23 April 1972

‘J.S. Lewinski’s portraiture has elements of a highly individual approach coupled with a soundly principled technique.’

 ‘[Lewinski] uses natural and domestic lighting, eschews flash, and there is a curious masculinity which dominates his work. When this meets a subject who can bear up under this very virile scrutiny the result is excellent, even superb. On the whole, as might be expected, men come out better than women from this confrontation [...]. Women whose character is strong enough fair splendidly [...].’

‘Caroline Brown has designed an elegant setting based on a large prismatic column, two white walls and one black. The area is small but the photographs, some blown to huge proportions with others superimposed on top, are well set off.’

Ainslie Ellis, ‘Work on View’ in The British Journal of Photography, 12 May 1972

‘The subject is literally at home and can therefore be himself, which is the first ingredient; the second is the photographer who has to blend with the surroundings till he becomes almost invisible. As a result, all the qualities of the subject become reflected in his face, and are captured by the camera.’

Peter Dyke in Arts Review, 6 May 1972