SNAP! Exhibition of Modern Portraiture organised by the Welsh Arts Council and the Arts Council of Great Britain. 18 March – 18 April 1971

Press Releases

1. SNAP! sets out to explore the idea of portraiture – of “likeness” – and attempts to place the activity of making likenesses in a social and aesthetic context. It also explores the motivation of artists when engaged on a portrait.

From the point of content the show is divided into three parts:-

The central part takes three artists, the painter David Hockney, the cartoonist Gerald Scarfe, the photographer David Bailey,   and explains how each of them approached the task of making a portrait.

The other two parts are complimentary to this. One consists of examples of portraits in a wide variety of media and of different periods chosen to show how the style and content of portraiture has always been related to changes in society, art and other means of communication.

The final section invites the spectator’s participation in the ‘game’ of likeness – the chance to make and manipulate faces and figures in the simplest ways. This will include life-size building blocks by Gerald Scarfe.

2.  From 18 March to 18 April, the SNAP! exhibition, like a giant pack of cards, fills the National Portrait Gallery’s exhibition area with an unprecedented variety of objects. The show appears at the Gallery by the special invitation of Dr Roy Strong who has also acted as consultant for the exhibition. It is the first joint project by the Arts Council of Great Britain and the Welsh Arts Council, and is the result of a decision to offer something other than the conventional type of arts exhibition. The theme is by Ken Baynes, author and designer, and Peter Jones of the Welsh Arts Council.

The idea

The SNAP! exhibition sets out to explore the idea of portraiture – of likeness – and attempts to place this activity in a broader context than that traditionally supplied by Fine Art. It also makes some attempt to explain the motivation and working methods of artists when engaged on a portrait.

The spectator is also offered the opportunity to make his own portrait, or ‘do his own thing.’ He can discover for himself the importance of the relationship between the subject and the image, which has been developed throughout the exhibition. In the final section of SNAP! is found the participation and comedy of portraiture which is typical of the sea-side pier. This fairground atmosphere is the design-inspiration for the setting of SNAP! with the strings of gaily coloured lights, and the masks on the paper bags which greet the visitor in place of the usual dreary ticket.

Historical section

Exhibits range from the precious elegance of the Chinese ivory Liu Po-Wen through to the original children’s game of Snap, to photographs of Malcolm Muggeridge, the sculptor Giacommetti, and Roosevelt giving the victory sign. There are idiosyncratic portraits such as a Spirit photograph including Sir Arthur Conan Doyle, and portraits appealing to the taste of the moment as do the mid-19th century tinsel pictures. ‘Cult’ images range from the portrayal of Hitler in Charlie Chaplin’s film ‘The Great Dictator,’ to cigarette cards of famous stars and a mask representing Rudolph Valentino.

Public figures, through technical innovations such as photography and mass production have been used increasingly in a symbolic and moral role, particularly war leaders such as the Kaiser and Kitchener. Reigning monarchs in particular become a focal point for current sentiments and ideals; the present Queen is represented on biscuit boxes and in a family album playing ‘Soldiers of the Queen.’

The artists

The variety of means for capturing likeness in 1971 is illustrated in the work of three artists:- David Hockney, David Bailey and Gerald Scarfe, all working in different media and with differing motivations and aims.

The main work by David Hockney is the recently completed portrait of his friends Ossie and Celia Clark, included by special permission of the Tate Gallery. This huge painting, seven feet by ten feet is shown together with the artist’s preparatory photographs and drawings, and also photographs of Hockney at work. There are two main differences between Hockney’s approach to portraiture and that of Bailey and Scarfe. Hockney is interested in portraying friends rather than public figures, and his painting took six months to complete in contrast to the swifter work of the photographer and cartoonist.

David Bailey is best known for capturing the trend-setting faces of today. But SNAP! includes some of the Polaroid prints which are a preliminary to a formal photographic session, and show the importance of accident and selection in portrait photography, where the image captured is truly instant. Bailey’s most recent work uses photographs as a basis for silk screen prints of Francoise Dorleac, Penelope Tree and Mick Jagger, exhibited here for the first time. A projected slide sequence shows Bailey at work on the portrait of Dr Roy Strong, and a sound track includes snatches of their conversation and the sounds of the studio.

Gerald Scarfe’s contribution includes the original drawings of many of his most famous cartoons. He has created especially for SNAP! a number of three dimensional works illustrating his preoccupation with the possibilities of ‘distortion,’ i.e. how far the characteristics of a familiar face can be exaggerated and yet remain recognisable. Here the figures grow out of the frame towards the spectator.

Participation Section

The visitor is invited to participate in the game of ‘likeness,’ children can draw on the blackboard a ‘head and shoulders’ shape; and there is a game where parts of faces on different cards can be assembled together to form weird and wonderful faces. Distorting mirrors give the spectator a new angle on himself and last but not least there will be a polyfoto studio where the visitor can have his photo taken with or without false noses and ears. A supermarket also offers bits and pieces to buy and take home. For this the organisers bought up the entire British stock of extraordinary French-made noses and moustaches.

Print

An original series of graphics by Design Systems of Cardiff will announce the exhibition. The Invitation Card includes a cut-out disguise and visitors to the Private View will be encouraged to put these on while the catalogue will be offered in a paper bag which can also be worn as a mask.

There are three different Posters which show heads with various features missing. This is a deliberate offer of participation and the organisers hope that spectators who want to fill in the missing eyes, noses and mouths will feel free to do so wherever they are found.

Tour

Following the National Portrait Gallery showing the exhibition will be shown in Wales at Newport (3rd-29th May), Swansea (9th June-3rd July) and Aberystwyth (28th August-18th September) and then in England at four more centres.

Handlist

  1. Drawing
    David Bailey
    by Gerald Scarfe 1971

  2. Photograph
    Gerald Scarfe
    by David Bailey 1969

 3.   Photograph
       David Hockney
by David Bailey 1965 (Box of Pinups, Weidenfeld & Nicholson).

 4.    Snap cards

The Old Original Game (Museum of Childhood, Edinburgh), Wild West Snap (Clifford Toys, lent by Ken and Kate Baynes) and Woodland Snap by Racey Helps (A Pepys Game, lent by Ken and Kate Baynes).

BACKGROUND PART 1

5.      Design for an inn sign
         The Lord Morrison of Lambeth
  by David Low (Whitbread & Co Ltd).

6.      Photograph of a drawing
         Dr J. Robert Oppenheimer
by Ben Shahn 1954 (The Museum of Modern Art, New York).

7.      Photograph of pottery figure
         Lydia Dwight
by John Dwight c1673 (Victoria and Albert Museum). Lydia Dwight was the 
         potter John Dwight’s daughter: she died when only a child.

8.      Photograph of painting
         The Painter’s Daughters
by Thomas Gainsborough (The National Gallery).

9.      Portrait Miniature of a Young Man by Nicolas Hilliard c1588 (The Victoria and Albert 
         Museum).

10.    Photograph of Cartoon
         Le Vrai Parisien (Lloyd George)
by E.T.R. 1917 (Imperial War Museum).

11.    Spirit photograph including Sir Arthur Conan Doyle, Sir Vincent and Lady Caillard,
         1935 (Psychic News).

12.    Photograph
         Malcolm Muggeridge
by David Bailey 1969 (Goodbye Baby and Amen, published by Condé
         Nast Publications Ltd.

13.    Photographs of memorials
         Karl Marx’s Grave and the Albert Memorial
by Chris Ridley 1970. Like many memorials
         these two include portraits.

14.    Photograph
         Jane Birkin
by David Bailey 1969 (Goodbye Baby and Amen, published by Condé Nast
         Publications Ltd.

15.    Photograph
         Cuauhctemocztin Street, Mexico City
by Henri Cartier-Bresson 1934 (John Hillelson
         Agency).

16.    Character from a comic
         Charlie Chaplin
from Funny Wonder, 1916 (IPC Ltd, Juvenile Group).

 17.   Photograph
         Alberto Giacometti
by Henri Cartier-Bresson, 1961 (John Hilleson Agency).

18.    Photograph
         Roosevelt giving the Victory Sign
, 1937 (United States Information Services).

19.    Shadow play instructions
         Duke of Wellington
, originally published in Ombromanie, 1860 and subsequently
         reproduced in Play Orbit catalogue (ICA, Welsh Arts Council, Studio International).

20.    Photograph of cartoon
         The Three Horsemen of the Apocalypse (Kuropatkin, Kitchener and Roosevelt on  
         hobby horses),
German, from Lustige Blatter, 1915 (Imperial War Museum).

21.    Lithograph
         Ian Fleming as James Bond
by Gerald Scarfe, 1970.

DAVID HOCKNEY

22.     Painting
          Mr & Mrs Clark & Percy by David Hockney, 1970 (The Tate Gallery)
          The painting was begun in April 1970. Hockney painted Celia almost immediately, but      
          kept changing Ossie, painting his face fifteen times between August and November. The 
          view through the window was also painted twelve times. The light comes straight 
          towards you and polaroid photographs were used to help clarify this effect. Percy is the
          cat.

23.     Photographs made for the portrait of Mr & Mrs Clark & Percy
          by David Hockney, 1970 (David Hockney).

24.     Photographs
          David Hockney working on the portrait of Mr & Mrs Clark & Percy
by Peter 
          Schlesinger, 1970 (David Hockney).

25.    Enlargements of polaroids made for the portrait of Mr & Mrs Clark & Percy
         by David Hockney, 1970 (David Hockney).

26.    PhotographsDrawings and photographs made for the portrait of Mr & Mrs Clark & 
         Percy
by David Hockney, 1970 (David Hockney).

27.     Drawing
          Celia Birtwell
by David Hockney, 1969 (David Hockney).

28.     Drawing
          Celia, Paris
by David Hockney 1969 (David Hockney).

29.     Etching
          Peter
by David Hockney, 1969 (Petersburg Press).

 30.    Frontispiece, etching
          Catherine Dorothea Viehmann
from Six Fairy Tales from the Brothers Grimm by David
          Hockney, 1965 (Petersburg Press).

31.     Lithograph on aluminium
          Picture of a Portrait in a Silver Frame
from A Hollywood Collection by David Hockney, 
         1965 (Editions Alecto).

BACKGROUND PART 2

32.     Facsimile poster
          May Milton
by Henri de Toulouse-Lautrec (published as a facsimile by Graphics Press,
          Zürich: lent by Ken and Kate Baynes).

33.     Waxwork head
          Alfred Hitchcock
by Jean Fraser, 1967 (Madame Tussaud’s Ltd London).

34.     Tinsel Pictures
          Early nineteenth century (The London Museum).

35.     Film still
          Man with a Gun
with Maxim Strauch as Lenin, 1938 (National Film Archive).

36.     Film still
          The Great Dictator,
produced, directed and written by Charlie Chaplin who also played
          ‘Hitler’ (Released through United Artists).

37.      Postcards of Film Stars (Ken and Kate Baynes, and the Museum of Childhood,
           Edinburgh).

38.     Cigarette cards
          Famous Stars
(Ken and Kate Baynes, and the Mansell Collection).

39.     Mask
          Rudolph Valentino
for a theatrical production, early 1930s (Blackpool Pleasure Beach
          Co).

40.     Coloured drawing
          Constance and Norma Talmadge
by Stanley Lench, 1956.

41.     Typographic profile
          Queen Victoria
from the profile on the ‘Penny Black’ stamp and made up of material on
          the history of the Royal College of Art by Jim Gibson. Used in an exhibition of RCA work in
          New York. (Royal College of Art).

42.     Cartonnage
          Funnery Mask,
Roman, from Faiyum (Bolton Museum and Art Gallery).

43.     Sculpture
          Liu Po-Wen,
Chinese ivory, early nineteenth century (The Graves Art Gallery Sheffield).

44.     Waxwork bust
          Leslie Caron
by Jane Jackson, 1959 (Madame Tussaud’s Ltd London).

45.     Sculpture
          Mussolini
by RA Bertelli (Imperial war Museum).

46.     Doll
          Lord Kitchener,
First World War period (Museum of Childhood, Edinburgh).

47.     Lapel Badges, Postcards, Armbands and a Scrapbook with Military and Royal
          Portraits
(Imperial War Museum and the Museum of Childhood, Edinburgh).

48.     Postcard portrait
          The Kaiser built from Atrocity Scenes,
French, First World War (Mr Woodrow).

49.     Cartoons, All including the Kaiser by Bernard Partridge, First World War, from Punch.

50.     Cigarette cards showing Allied Monarchs and Generals for Wills Cigarettes, First World  
          War (Imperial War Museum).

51.     Drawing
          The Jackdaw of Rheims
by Edmund J Sullivan, 1915 (Imperial War Museum).

52.     Illustration
          Field Marshall Sir Douglas Haigh KT GCB GCVO KCIE ADC
by Francis Dodd, 1917
          (Imperial War Museum).

53.     Model
          Queen Alexandra,
Lord Roberts, Memorial Workshops, 1917 (Imperial War Museum).

54.     Toby jugs
          Marshall Joffre, HM King George V, Mr Woodrow Wilson
by Sir F Carruthers, 1915-18.
          Made by Soane and Smith Ltd (Imperial War Museum).

55.     Model
          On the Warpath: Mr W Wilson, President of the United States
by André Deruffe, 1917
          (Imperial War Museum).

56.     Postcard with cartouche for ‘Portrait’, Second World War (Museum of Childhood,
          Edinburgh).

57.     Photograph
          Mata Hari
(The Press Association Ltd).

58.     Book pages
          Apollo 11 Portraits
from Man on The Moon (United States Information Service).

59.     Lapel badge
          Commemorating Space Flight,
Russian (Museum of Childhood, Edinburgh).

60.     Postage Stamps
          British current issues with portraits of the Queen,
1971. Also included is the relief
          head by Arnold Machin on which the stamps are based. (Post Office).

61.     Coronation head
          Queen Elizabeth II
by D. Landi, 1953.

62.     Photograph of print
          Queen Victoria and her grandchildren
(The Press Association Ltd).

63.     Magazine produced by children
          The Phoenix
with a portrait of Queen Victoria, 1887 (Museum of Childhood, Edinburgh).

64.     Cut out
          King George VI in RAF uniform
(Museum of Childhood, Edinburgh).

65.     Lapel Badges (Museum of Childhood, Edinburgh).

66.     Biscuit tin with sepia photograph
          The Royal Family
(Museum of Childhood, Edinburgh).

67.     Photo-Album with Musical Box, late nineteenth century (Rodney & Jill Bennett).

68.     Fletcher family photographs (Miss D E Fletcher).

69.     Reproduction of stained glass
          Sir James Berners, A patron of the Church
from St Mary’s, West Horsely, Surrey.
          Photograph by Alfred Lammer from English Stained Glass published by Thames and
          Hudson (Alfred Lammer).

70.     Photograph of wall painting
          King Billy,
Northern Ireland by Peter Jones.

71.     Death Mask
          Oliver Cromwell
(The London Museum).

72.     Engraving
          The Great Conspiracy (Guy Fawkes and fellow conspirators),
Dutch 1605/6 (The
          Mansell Collection).

73.     Thermogram showing a Man wearing spectacles taken on an evapograph made by
          Baird-Atomic Inc. Photograph by Sol Mednick, 1967. (From Scientific American).

74.     Painting
          Sir Nicholas Bacon by unknown artist, c1560 (The National Portrait Gallery).

75.     Photograph of sculpture
          Giovanni Chellini
by Antonio Rossellino (Victoria and Albert Museum).

76.     Photograph of sculpture Henry VII and Elizabeth of York (Westminster Abbey
          Museum).

77.     Engraving
          Doublûres of Characters – or – Striking resemblances in Phisiognomy
by James
          Gillray, 1798 (Mr  & Mrs M Jaffé).

78.     Painting
          Portrait of Hugh Gaitskell as a famous monster of Filmland
by Richard Hamilton, 1964
          (Arts Council of Great Britain).

79.     Photographs
          Group of workers at Smith Stone & Knights Paper Mills Saltley
by Benjamin Stone,
          1895 (The Reference Library, Birmingham).

80.     Photograph
          Members of the Cerrig y Drudion Friendly Society
(National Museum of Wales, Welsh
          Folk Museum).

81.     Photograph
          Workers on a farm in Sennybridge, Brecknockshire
c1910 (National Museum of Wales,
          Welsh Folk Museum).

82.     Illuminated address to Mr David Griffiths, 1921 (National Museum of Wales).

83.     Painting
          La Réproduction Interdite
by Renee Magritte (Brighton Art Gallery: James Foundation).

84.     Painting
          Mrs Cecelia Bowen
by E R Hughes, 1874 (Mrs J G Prothero-Beyon).

85.     Painting
          Portrait of a woman with a coral necklace
by Gwen John (Welsh Arts Council).

86.     Painting
          Caroline
by Lucian Freud (Arts Council of Great Britain).

87.     Painting
          A Summer Day in Hyde Park
by John Ritchie 1858 (The London Museum).

88.     Silkscreen
          Marilyn Monroe
by Andy Warhol, 1962 (Castelli Graphics).

89.     Encaustic funerary painting
          Portrait of a woman,
Graeco-Roman (The National Gallery).

90.     Multiple
          Sitzbilder (of Beethoven)
by Otto Dressler (Gallery Kummel).

91.     Poster
          Von Hindenberg
by Louis Oppenheim c1914/15 (Imperial War Museum).

DAVID BAILEY

92.     Photograph
          Marisa Berenson
by David Bailey, 1970.

93.     Photograph
          Marisa Berenson & Helmut Berger
by David Bailey, 1970.

94.     Photograph
          Bill Brandt
by David Bailey, 1969 (Goodbye Baby & Amen published by Condé Nast
          Publications Ltd).

95.     Photograph
          Sam Szafran
by David Bailey, 1970.

96.     Photograph
          Cecil Beaton
by David Bailey, 1970.

97.     Photograph
          Lartique
by David Bailey, 1971.

98.     Photograph
          Man Ray
by David Bailey, 1970.

99.     Photograph
           The Earl of Snowdon
by David Bailey, 1969 (Goodbye Baby & Amen published by Condé
           Nast Publications Ltd).

100.   Photograph
           The Earl of Lichfield
by David Bailey, 1969 (Goodbye Baby & Amen published by Condé
           Nast Publications Ltd).

101.   Photograph
           Penelope Tree
by David Bailey, 1969 (Goodbye Baby & Amen published by Condé Nast
           Publications Ltd).

102.   Photograph
           Julie Driscoll
by David Bailey, 1969 (Goodbye Baby & Amen published by Condé Nast
           Publications Ltd).

103.   Photograph
          Ingrid Boulting
by David Bailey, by David Bailey, 1969 (Goodbye Baby & Amen published
          by Condé Nast Publications Ltd).

104.   Photograph
           Candice Bergen
by David Bailey, 1969 (Goodbye Baby & Amen published by Condé Nast
           Publications Ltd).

105.   Photograph
           Susan Murray
by David Bailey, 1969 (Goodbye Baby & Amen published by Condé Nast
           Publications Ltd).

106.   Photograph
           John Lennon
by David Bailey, 1969 (Goodbye Baby & Amen published by Condé Nast
           Publications Ltd).

107.   Photograph
           Christine Keeler
by David Bailey, 1969 (Goodbye Baby & Amen published by Condé Nast
           Publications Ltd).

108.   Photograph
           Sharon Tate and Roman Polanski
by David Bailey, 1969 (Goodbye Baby & Amen
           published by Condé Nast Publications Ltd).

109.   Photograph
           Peter Ustinov
by David Bailey, 1969 (Goodbye Baby & Amen published by Condé Nast
           Publications Ltd).

110.   Photograph
           Roger Vadim
by David Bailey, 1969 (Goodbye Baby & Amen published by Condé Nast
           Publications Ltd).

111.   Photograph
           Raquel Welch
by David Bailey, 1969 (Goodbye Baby & Amen published by Condé Nast
           Publications Ltd).

112.   Photograph
           Ravi Shankar
by David Bailey, 1969 (Goodbye Baby & Amen published by Condé Nast
           Publications Ltd).

113.   Photograph
           Richard Attenborough
by David Bailey, 1969 (Goodbye Baby & Amen published by Condé
           Nast Publications Ltd).

114.   Photograph
           Justin de Villeneuve and Twiggy
by David Bailey, 1969 (Goodbye Baby & Amen
           published
           by Condé Nast Publications Ltd).

115.   Photograph
           Alan Aldridge
by David Bailey, 1969 (Goodbye Baby & Amen published by Condé Nast
           Publications Ltd).

116.    Photograph
            James Lloyd
by David Bailey, 1969 (Goodbye Baby & Amen published by Condé Nast
            Publications Ltd).

117.    Photograph
            John Huston
by David Bailey.

118.   Photograph
           Andy Warhol
by David Bailey, 1969 (Goodbye Baby & Amen published by Condé Nast
           Publications Ltd).

119.   Photograph
           Jocelyn Stevens
by David Bailey, 1969 (Goodbye Baby & Amen published by Condé Nast
           Publications Ltd).

120.   Photograph
           David Frost
by David Bailey, 1969 (Goodbye Baby & Amen published by Condé Nast
           Publications Ltd).

121.   Photograph
           Bjorn Andresen
by David Bailey, 1970 (Vogue Magazine, from Visconti film ‘Death in
           Venice’).

122.   Photograph
           Vanessa Redgrave
by David Bailey, 1969 (Goodbye Baby & Amen published by Condé
           Nast Publications Ltd).

123.   Photograph
           Roman Polanski
by David Bailey, 1969 (Goodbye Baby & Amen published by Condé Nast
           Publications Ltd).

124.   Photograph
           Jordan Kalfus
by David Bailey, 1970.

125.   Photograph
           Marianne Faithfull
by David Bailey, 1969 (Goodbye Baby & Amen published by Condé
           Nast Publications Ltd).

126.   Photograph
           Joseph Losey
by David Bailey, 1969 (Goodbye Baby & Amen published by Condé Nast
           Publications Ltd).

127.   Photograph
           P J Proby
by David Bailey, 1965.

128.   Photograph
           Yul Brynner
by David Bailey, 1970.

129.   Photograph
           Brian Jones and Penelope Tree
by David Bailey, 1969.

130.   Photograph
           Dr Roy Strong
by David Bailey, 1970.
           A slide sequence shows David Bailey at work on this portrait and the sound track
           records something of their conversation.

131.   Photograph
           Philip Johnson
by David Bailey, 1970.

132.   Photograph
           Mick Jagger, Charlie Watts, David Bailey
by David Bailey, 1970.

133.   Polaroid Prints by David Bailey.
           This selection of prints, taken from test shots, was made to show the importance of
           accident and selection in making a portrait. It is these prints that are normally discarded
           as being valueless, but David Bailey finds that they frequently have unexpected quality.

134.   Silkscreen print
           Françoise Dorleac
by David Bailey, 1970.

135.   Photograph
           Penelope Tree
by David Bailey, 1970.

136.   Silkscreen prints
           Penelope Tree
by David Bailey, 1971.

137.   Silkscreen prints.
           Mick Jagger
by David Bailey, 1970.

138.   Photograph
           Françoise Dorleac and Catherine Deneuve
by David Bailey, 1969 (Goodbye Baby &
           Amen

           published by Condé Nast Publications Ltd).

139.   Photograph
           Penelope Tree
by David Bailey, 1970.

140.   Silkscreen prints
           Penelope Tree
by David Bailey, 1970.

141.   Photograph
           Pauline Boty
by David Bailey, 1969 (Goodbye Baby & Amen published by Condé Nast
           Publications Ltd).

GERALD SCARFE

142.   Lithograph
           Enoch Powell
by Gerald Scarfe, 1969.

143.   Lithograph
           Pregnant Pope
by Gerald Scarfe, 1970.

144.   Lithograph
           The Queen
by Gerald Scarfe, 1970.

145.   Drawing
           Churchill, Onassis, Beaverbrook and James Cameron at Dinner
by Gerald Scarfe,
           1967
           (Published in the New Statesman).

146.    Drawing
            Aubrey Beardsley
by Gerald Scarfe, 1967 (Published in the New Statesman).

147.    Drawing
            The Middle East – Nasser and Dayan
by Gerald Scarfe, 1970 (Published in the New
            Statesman
).

148.   Drawing
           Enoch Powell – A Nasty Shock
by Gerald Scarfe, 1970.

149.   Drawings
           Nixon 1,2,3,4
by Gerald Scarfe, 1970.

150.   Sculpture
           Nixon in Cloth
by Gerald Scarfe, 1971.

151.   Sculpture
           Nixon in Wood
by Gerald Scarfe, 1971.

152.   Sculpture
           Heath in Wood
by Gerald Scarfe, 1971.

153.   Models
           Chairman Mao, Nixon, Edward Heath, Enoch Powell
by Gerald Scarfe, 1971.

    MIRRON MIRROR ON THE WALL
    The final section of the exhibition invites the visitor to take part in a number of
    “likeness” games and to record or change his or her own face. It also pays homage to
    the comedy of appearance: to the seaside postcard; the carnival mask; and the false
    moustache world of the joke shop.

154.   Carriage pot with portrait of Gladstone (James Klugmann Collection).

155.   Photographs
           The famous Gue Tsang Six Chinese Wonders,
1932 (Blackpool Pleasure Beach Co.).

156.   Half masks
           Chinaman, Indian, Mongol

           Purchased in Cardiff, 1970 (Peter Jones).

157.   Seaside Postcards
           (Sam Smith and Blackpool Pleasure Beach Co.)

158.   ‘Crowd’ Masks for a Pantomime (The Museum of Childhood, Edinburgh).

159.   Clown Mask c1960
           (Blackpool Pleasure Beach Co.)

160.   Mr Punch Mask c1940
           (Blackpool Pleasure Beach Co.)

161.   Beethoven with red nose and goggles
           (Chris Ridley and Ken and Kate Baynes).

162.   TV Graphics
           Enoch Powell
by Terry Gilliam (BBC TV).

163.   Game
           Identipops
by Playvalue Ltd

164.   Photograph of cartoon
           The Joys of Photography
by Geroge Du Maurier, 1886 from Society Pictures from Punch,
           1891 (The British Museum).

165.   Snap Face Game
           Mouths, moustaches, noses and eyes by courtesy of Ugly Enterprises Ltd.

166.   Photostudio at National Portrait Gallery by Polyphoto (England) Ltd.

167.   Seaside backdrop
           Wrestlers
by Ronald Marlowe c1965 (Northwest Photo Services Ltd, Blackpool).

168.   Model Agency Cards, 1971
           (Ugly Enterprises Ltd).

169.   Equipment for Portrait Photography (Aaron Scharf).

170.   Photograph
           Jeremy Thorpe,
Press Association Photograph

171.   Photograph
           Edward Heath at Broadstairs,
setting out for fishing, Press Association Photograph,
           1967.

172.   Photograph
           R.A. Butler, Chancellor of the Exchequer on the steps of No 10,
Press Association
           photograph, 1955.

173.   Photograph
          Mr & Mrs Harold Wilson holidaying in the Scilly Isles,
Press Association photograph,
          1965.


Visitor responses and press reviews

The exhibition was open for a month and attracted 29,000 visitors.

One frequent visitor wrote to the director, Dr Roy Strong, to complain:

‘It is full of trash, amateurish floor-droppings of a poor art class populated by “sick” students who do not know where to go or do. [...] Draughtsmanship is lacking and the crude methods used, because they are flashy would be those of an ideas man employed by an advertising agency.’

‘The tomfoolery at the end of the show proves how stupid it all can be.’

Lawrence Bloom, 25 March 1971

‘It is, in a word, camp.’

‘You have to hand it to the organisers for having enough crust to put over this witty little stunt, squashed into poky corridors and given a fairground air, as a serious attempt to investigate the likeness, the contemporary portrait.’

‘Visitors are expected to emerge the wiser about the motivation and working methods of these artists when engaged on a portrait. The trouble is, they might just do that.’

David Taylor, ‘Snap, crackle, flop’ in Punch, 30 March 1971.

‘All preconceptions about portraiture are ruthlessly violated; David Hockney, David Bailey and Gerald Scarfe bring polaroids, film strips, taped interviews to assist in anatomising sitters; tear their clothes off, batter down their defences, carve them open, before finally perpetuating them in paint, in photograph or in caricature. It’s all savagely irreverent but ends in dishing up a more faithful image of men and women of the 1970s than we’ve seen before. And that, surely, is what a National Portrait Gallery’s job ought to be about.’

Lady, 15 April 1971

‘I started in a queue half way down the Charing Cross Road [...] and admired once again the devilish cunning with which Dr Roy Strong gets people involved [...] the organisers seemed to me to have made no mistakes.’

Clement Freud, ‘Snap’ in The Financial Times, 20 March 1971

‘See this show if you can. In my book it’s one of the best yet – largely for its no-nonsense de-bunking of portraiture mystique with, at the same time, much that is highly constructive.’

George Hughes, Amateur Photographer, 7 April 1971.