The Man Who Shot Garbo

Photographs by Clarence Sinclair Bull

26 May -28 August 1989

Forward to National Portrait Gallery Catalogue: The Man Who Shot Garbo

Clarence Bull was one of the greats – I was thrilled when I went to MGM to know that he was going to photograph me. I was terrified.

Was I interesting enough?

He had done Garbo for years. The pictures were extraordinary. Her head, his lighting, they combined into something unique.

I felt like a sort of mouse, standing by for a lion. He came; he was easy; he was sweet; he was distant.

Listen, so was I.  I was easy; I was sweet; I was distant. We never got to know each other, but I knew he liked working with me, and I knew I liked working with him. In fact, we were both delighted—we were relieved—we were a happy pair and it was fun.

Now I can only say –hey! Wasn’t I lucky? I sure was born at the right time.

Clarence Bull!

And at the National Portrait Gallery!

WOW!

-Katharine Hepburn

Curator’s Introductory Essay by Terence Pepper

Other texts included full biographical texts on plates by John Kobal, bibliography, etc.

Clarence Sinclair Bull was one of the great masters of the Hollywood portrait. As head of the stills department at MGM for over thirty years, he helped to pioneer the art and craft of the film studio gallery portraitist. These images, once regarded merely as anonymous publicity photographs, have now been re-evaluated for their crucial role in both the creation of cinema iconography and the history of twentieth-century portrait photography.

Clarence Bull was the only child of Charles Albert Bull, a cattle rancher, and Bell Sinclair, a Scottish-Canadian schoolteacher from Ontario. He was born on 26 May 1986 near the small town of Sun River near Great Falls in Montana. Brought up on a ranch, his early interest in art was channelled into photography on the advice of the famous cowboy artist, Charles M. Russell, who had given him some lessons in drawing. Throughout school and college, in his spare time, Bull taught himself photography and the rudiments of film-making. He set up a film printing and developing service in his father’s general store, where he also sold his photographs of local Bronco Busters (no. 1) and Western scenes as postcards. One of the customers was Mrs Frank Lloyd, wife of the famous Glasgow-born film director. Through her, he gained an introduction to her husband and an invitation to work as an assistant cameraman in Hollywood. He set off in 1917. During his first years there he worked for a number of film studios as a cameraman and part-time stills photographer, before choosing to concentrate on stills and portrait photography for the newly-emerging film industry. Bull’s first film assignment as assistant cameraman and stills photographer was on Metro’s Breakers Ahead (1918), directed by Charles Brabin and starring Viola Dana. When Metro closed, six months later, Bull moved to Triangle Pictures in their purpose-built studios in Culver City. He was at home there, photographing cowboys as he had in Montana. Triangle Pictures were in turn taken over by Samuel Goldwyn in 1919, and this marked a change in Bull’s full-time work. No longer a film cameraman, he took stills, such as the on-set studies of Helen Ferguson and Lillian Hall for Going Some (no. 6) and later concentrated on portraits of leading players, such as Alec Francis for The Man Who Saw Tomorrow (1922) (no. 9). This early portrait shows Bull’s fascination with creating mood and atmosphere by using low lighting levels (in this case, a solitary candle, which became a recurring motif in his work). Goldwyn Studios were in turn amalgamated in 1924 into a new company, Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer, with Irving Thalberg, the so-called ‘boy genius’, in charge of production, and Howard Strickling, whom Bull was answerable to, at the head of the publicity department.

Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer was arguably the most financially and artistically successful studio in the golden era of Hollywood filmmaking in the 1920s and 1930s. Under the leadership of Louis B. Mayer, the studio claimed that it had ‘more stars than there are in Heaven’. There was a grain of truth in this exaggerated boast, in that MGM employed more stars and talented production staff than any of its rivals. The photographs produced by Bull and those who worked under him popularized MGM’s stars throughout the world.

Bull later estimated that he photographed at least 10,000 separate subjects during his career. Of these, the most famous and most reclusive was Greta Garbo, the so-called ‘Swedish Sphinx’. Born in Stockholm, she was signed by MGM in 1925 after the success of Costa Berling’s Saga, directed by her first mentor, Maurice Stiller. Garbo was the most beguiling and mysterious of all Hollywood’s stars and the legend that grew up around her was one of the great successes of the studio publicity machine, which capitalised on her innate shyness and an un-American dislike of publicity. Her meteoric box-office success and enormous appeal to the movie-going public ensured that the conditions she demanded in return for her continuing work at the studio were usually fulfilled: one of those was that from 1929 onwards she would pose for film and publicity portraits only to Clarence Sinclair Bull. Starting with his mesmeric half-lit and mysterious portraits for her last silent film The Kiss (27 August 1929; nos. 31-2, 34, 147), they together created some of the greatest images in the history of the portrait photograph.

Garbo responded to Bull’s quiet professional approach and spent one or two days after completing each film posing in his studio. He estimated that he had taken over 4,000 individual studies of her during their collaboration, which lasted until she retired in 1941. At each session Bull sought to capture the magic, beauty and inner mystery that Garbo projected in her screen roles. The lighting techniques he devised for her exemplify the complete mastery he exercised over his craft; his portrayal of Garbo in Queen Christina with her face finely modelled using long exposures and soft candle light, and the study of her as the sea captain’s daughter in her first talkie, Anna Christie, illuminated by a ship’s lantern containing a concealed spotlight, are among his most innovative. Bull refined and perfected these techniques alone in his studio, working with a plaster bust or experimenting with his model-turned-actress wife, Jeanne. Garbo’s image defined in her films and in Bull’s portraits influenced not only the look and fashions of a generation of movie-goers, but also of many of her fellow screen stars.

Known as Garbo’s personal photographer, Bull was in demand to enhance the images of all the studio’s top stars. He met Clark Gable on his first day at MGM and quickly established a personal as well as long-term professional relationship as he did with Johnny Weissmuller and many of the other stars. Working at the studio for a number of years gave Bull the opportunity to become familiar with the studio’s stars and the images they wished to project on screen, so that he was able to translate these images into characteristic and definitive portraits. Bull’s portraits of Gable with his co-star of several films, Jean Harlow, from their first film together, Red Dust (no.94), until their last, Saratoga of 1937 (no. 109-10), demonstrate clearly his ability to capture the romantic electricity that they created together on screen. The 1930s were probably Bull’s most creative years in terms of the number of subjects he photographed, but at the start of the 1940s he was ready to portray a whole new generation of up-and-coming stars such as Katharine Hepburn, whose career was relaunched by the success of The Philadelphia Story (1940), Ava Gardner, Robert Mitchum, Greer Garson and Angela Lansbury. Bull experimented with colour throughout his career, starting with the unsophisticated hand-colouring on a portrait of Mabel Ballin as Becky Sharpe for Vanity Fair (no. 16). His first colour success was with a rarely published portrait of Garbo as Marguerite Gautier in Camille (no. 72), but it was not until the late 1940s that Bull was fully able to explore the possibilities of colour photography. As a pioneer in the introduction of strobe lighting and the use of colour, it was appropriate that when Bull photographed a group of 64 MGM stars in 1943 for the Studio’s 20th birthday he used colour to record in one photograph the largest number of stars ever assembled together from one studio (no. 141).

Throughout the 1950s Bull acted as an ambassador for MGM by giving celebrity lectures and demonstrations throughout the United States to interested photographic and student groups. He still found time to take important photographs for some of MGM’s prestige films, including studies of Claire Bloom for The Brothers Karamazov (no. 139), Leslie Caron for Gigi (no. 137) and Grace Kelly for High Society (no. 142). When Bull died of a heart attack on 8 June 1979, he was in the process of producing a limited edition portfolio of some of his greatest portraits of Greta Garbo, including perhaps his most famous photograph of her from The Kiss (no. 34 and cover).  He lived to see his work re-evaluated in a number of important exhibitions and in his own lifetime witnessed the assimilation of his photographs into the legend of Hollywood.   

Press Extracts

 ‘The Man Who Shot Garbo, otherwise Clarence Sinclair Bull, was one of the most distinguished of these. As the title of the National Portrait Gallery show suggests, he worked for long years at MGM, and was Garbo’s regular, favourite photographer...Serving the Dream Factory was felt for a while, in the heyday of The Family of Man, to be unworthy, productive of kitsch rather than art. Fortunately now we are broad-minded enough to see the benefits of both approaches. And before the miraculous beauty of vintage Bull images it is very difficult to remain unmoved.’    

The Times, ‘Called shots, thrown pots,’ 13 June 1989 – John Russell Taylor

‘Above all, it is his manipulation of light sources, film stocks, special effects and contouring that have ensured his influence upon other photographers since – and other artists, as well, including Andy Warhol. It is ironic that his work had to be collected and exhibited in London before the name behind the classic shots could become more familiar.’

The American, ‘Hollywood image-maker,’ 2 June 1989

‘To have achieved so much before World War II, to have been the icon-maker of such a magical period must have been satisfaction enough to smooth any old age. There is no other photographer who tells us about a film or play so directly, while simultaneously presenting so exacting an image of the actor themselves.’

The Independent, ‘Making Faces in Hollywood,’ 14 July 1989 – Philip Core

‘Bull’s photographs succeeded because they enabled fans to get up close to these semi-divine beings, to inspect their flawless complexions, perfectly plucked eyebrows, diamond bracelets and immaculate clothes – and to conclude, paradoxically, that they were real.’

Daily Telegraph, ‘Delusions of glamour,’ 19 June 1989 – Richard Dorment

Handlist

1. Bert Vedder, Rider on the F Ranch of W.K. Floweree Montana Bronco Buster Vintage print, 1916

2. Triangle Studio Cowboys
Vintage print, 1918

3. Triangle Studio Cowboy
Vintage print, 1918

4. Goldwyn Studios on Washington Boulevard, Culver City, Los Angeles Vintage print, 1919

5. Clarence Sinclair Bull 1896-1979 as assistant cameraman with the director Frank Lloyd 1888-1960 and Pauline Frederick 1999-1960 Vintage print, 1919

6. Helen Ferguson, 1901-77, with Lillian Hall For Going Some Vintage film still, 1920

7. Clarence Sinclair Bull with his crew: Milton Browne, Frank Bjering, Fred Morgan, Homer van Pelt, Merritts Stibold, James Mannett and Bert Longworth Vintage print, 1926

8. Hobart Bosworth 1867-1943 with ‘Teddy’ For The Man Alone Vintage print, 1922

9. Alec B. Francis 1869-1934 For The Man Who Saw Tomorrow Vintage print 1922

10.   Shannon Day
Vintage print, 1923

11. Antonio Moreno (Antonio Monteagudo) 1887-1967 and Colleen Moore (Kathleen Morrison) 1900-88 For Look Your Best Vintage print, 1923

12. Bessie Love (Juanita Horton) 1898-1987 Vintage print, 1921

13. Molly Malone 1895-1952 Vintage print, 1921

14. Mae Busch 1897-1946 Vintage print, 1923

15. Mabel Normand (Muriel Fortescue) 1894-1930 Costume study for The Slim Princess Vintage print, 1923

16. Mabel Ballin 1885-1952 As Becky Sharpe in Vanity Fair Hand coloured vintage bromide print, 1923

17. Carmel Myers 1899-1980 In costume for Slaves of Desire Vintage print, 1923

18. Elinor Glyn 1864-1943 Vintage print 1920s

19. Mae Murray (Marie Adrieen Koenig), 1885-1965 As The Merry Widow Modern print from original negative, 1925

20. ‘Deserted’ Pictorial study on empty Goldwyn set Vintage print, 1922

21. Joan Crawford (Lucille Fay le Sueur) 1904-77 Publicity portrait for Pretty Ladies Vintage print, 1928

22. Lillian Gish (Lillian de Guiche) 1896- 1993 Costume study for The Wind Vintage print, 1928

23. Tim McCoy 1891-1978 Pictorial study for Wyoming Vintage print, 22 October 1927

24. Helene Chadwick 1897-1940 Vintage print, 1920s

25. Jeanne Eagels 1894-1929
For Man, Woman and Sin Toned vintage print, 1927

26. Leatrice Joy (Leatrice Joy Zeidler) 1896-1985 Vintage print, 1923

27. John Gilbert (John Pringle) 1895-1936 Vintage print, 1929

28. Greta Garbo (Greta Gustafsson), 1905-90 and John Gilbert 1895-1936 For Love Vintage print, 28 July 1927

29. Greta Garbo, 1905-90 For Anna Christie Modern print from original negative, 19 November 1929

30. Tim McCoy 1891-1978 In costume for Riders of the Dark Modern print from original negative, 29 July 1927

31. Greta Garbo 1905-90 For The Kiss Vintage print, 27 August 1929

32. Greta Garbo 1905-90
For The Kiss
Vintage print, 27 August 1929

33. Ann Dvorak (Ann McKim) 1912-79 and Raquel Torres (Paula Osterman) 1908-87 Modern print from original negative, 11 June 1929

34. Greta Garbo 1905-90
For The Kiss
Modern print from original negative, 27 August 1929

35. Buster Keaton (Joseph Francis Keaton) 1895-1966
Vintage print, 17 December 1930

36. Bessie Love 1898-1987
Vintage print, 1930

37. Marie Dressler (Leila Marie Koerber) 1869-1934
Vintage print, June 1932

38. Lilian Bond 1908-1991
Vintage print 1931

39. Jimmy Durante 1893-1980
In costume for Speak Easily
Vintage print, 1932

40. Anita Loos 1891-1981
Vintage print, 25 June 1932

41. Helen Twelvetrees (Helen Marie Jurgens) 1907-58
Vintage print, June 1932

42. Virginia Cherrill 1908-1996
Vintage print, 1932

43. Evelyn Laye (Elsie Evelyn Lay) 1900-1996
Modern print from original negative, 1934
x34531

44. Diana Wynyard (Dorothy Isobel Cox) 1906-64 For Reunion in Vienna
Modern print from original negative, 9 March 1933

45. Johnny Weissmuller (Peter John Weissmuller) 1904-84
Modern print from original negative, 14 February 1933

46. Johnny Weissmuller 1904-84
Modern print from original negative, 26 December 1934

47. Boris Karloff (William Henry Pratt) 1887-1969
For The Mask of Fu Manchu
Modern print from original negative, 24 August 1932
x35333

48. Charles Boyer 1897-1978
Modern print from original negative, 2 February 1931

49. Clark Gable 1901-60
Modern print from original negative, 30 October 1931

50. Maurice Chevalier 1888-1972
For The Merry Widow
Vintage print, 9 February 1934

51. Bing Crosby (Harry Lillis Crosby)
1904-77
For Going Hollywood
Modern print from original negative, 29 August 1933

52. Jean Harlow 1911-37
Modern print from original negative, 8 July 1932

53. Joan Crawford 1906-77
Modern print from original negative, 24 May 1930

54. Norma Shearer 1900-83 with Gilbert Adrian (‘Adrian’) 1903-53
For Strange Interlude
Modern print from original negative, 5 December 1932

55. Cedric Gibbons 1893-1960 with his wife Dolores del Rio (Lolita Dolores Martinez Azunsolo Lopez Negrette) 1905-83
Modern print from original negative, 28 May 1932

56.   John 1882-1942, Ethel (Edith) 1879-1959 and Lionel 1878-1954 Barrymore
Modern print from original negative, 8 August 1932

57. Walt Disney 1901-66
Vintage print, 1933

58. Jackie Cooper (John Cooper)
1921-2011
Vintage print, 1931

59. Deanna Durbin (Edna Mae Durbin), 1921-2013
Modern print from original negative, 3 April 1936

60. Judy Garland (Frances Gumm) 1922-69
Vintage print, 1936

61. Freddie Bartholomew (Frederick Llewellyn) 1924-92 In costume for David Copperfield
Modern print from original negative, 27 October 1934

62. W.C. Fields (William Claude Dukenfield) 1879-1946
As Mr Micawber in David Copperfield
Modern print from original negative, 8 November 1934

63. Clarence Sinclair Bull 1986-1979 photographing chorus girls on Broadway Melody of 1936
Photograph by Tom Evans
Modern print from original negative, 16 April 1936

64. Chorus girls of Broadway Melody of 1936
Modern print from original negative, 16 April 1935

65. The Albertina Rasch Dancers during a rehearsal break for Broadway Melody of 1936
Modern print from original negative, 29 March 1935

66. Gary Cooper (Frank J. Cooper) 1901-61
Modern print from original negative, 17 April 1934

67. Greta Garbo 1905-90
For Mata Hari
Modern print from original negative, 19 November 1931

68. Greta Garbo 1905-90
For Inspiration
Vintage print, 12 December 1930

69. Greta Garbo 1905-90
For Susan Lenox
Modern print from original negative, 8 July 1931

70. Greta Garbo 1905-90
For As You Desire Me
Vintage print, 13 April 1932

71. Greta Garbo 1905-90
For Camille
Vintage print, 23 November 1936

72. Greta Garbo 1905-90
As Marguerite Gautier in Camille
Vintage print, 1936

73. Greta Garbo 1905-90
For As You Desire Me
Vintage print, 13 April 1932

74. Greta Garbo 1905-90
For Inspiration
Vintage print, 12 December 1930

75. Greta Garbo 1905-90
For Susan Lenox
Vintage print, 8 July 1931

76. Greta Garbo
1905-90 For Susan Lenox
Vintage print, 8 July 1931

77. Greta Garbo
1905-90
For Susan Lenox
Modern print from original negative, 8 July 1931

78. William H. Daniels 1895-1970
Modern print from original negative, 21 February 1933

79. ‘Chris’ (Greta Garbo’s stand-in)
Vintage print, 1930s

80. Herbert Marshall 1890-1966
Modern print from original negative, 2 February 1934

81. Ronald Colman 1891-1958
As Sydney Carton in A Tale of Two Cities
Vintage print, June 1935

82. Benita Hume 1906-57
Modern print from original negative, 27 February 1934

 

   

83. Elsa Lanchester (Elizabeth Sullivan) 1902-86
Modern print from original negative, 23 May 1934
x35329

84. Charles Laughton 1899-1962
Modern print from original negative, 1 July 1934

85. Leslie Howard (Leslie Stainer) 1893-1943
Modern print from original negative, 1931
x35331

86. Frank Lloyd 1888-1960
Vintage print, 1935

87. Charles Laughton 1899-1962
As Captain Bligh in Mutiny on the Bounty
Vintage print, 18 July 1935

88. Clark Gable
As Rhett Butler in Gone With The Wind
Vintage print, 28 June 1939

89. Clark Gable 1901-60 and Vivien Leigh 1913-67
As Rhett Butler and Scarlett O’Hara for Gone With The Wind Modern print from original negative, 28 June 1939
x35326

90. Vivien Leigh (Vivian Mary Hartley) 1913-67
As Scarlett O’Hara for Gone With The Wind Modern print from original negative, 28 February 1939

91. Premiere for Grand Hotel at Grauman’s Chinese Theatre (montage)
Modern print from original negative, 1932

92. Art deco revolving entrance for Grand Hotel
Vintage print, 30 January 1932

93. Greta Garbo 1905-90
As ‘The Sphinx’
Modern print from copy negative, 1931
x127272

94. Jean Harlow (Harlean Carpenter) 1911-37 and Clark Gable 1901-60
For Red Dust
Vintage print, 1932

95. Jean Harlow 1911-37
Modern print from original negative, 1932

96. Jean Harlow 1911-37
Vintage print, 20 July 1932

97. Jean Harlow 1911-37
Modern print from original negative, 8 July 1932

98. Jean Harlow 1911-37
For The Girl From Missouri
Modern print from original negative, 8 July 1934

99. Gloria Swanson (Gloria Josephine Mae Swenson) 1897-1983
Vintage print, 1934

100. Marion Davies  1898-1961
For Blondie of the Follies
Vintage print, 9 July 1932

101. Constance Bennett 1904-65
Vintage print, 1934

102. Carole Lombard (Jane Alice Peters) 1908-42
Vintage print, 17 October 1934

103. Loretta Young (Gretchen Michaela Young) 1913-2000
Modern print from original negative, 5 May 1933

104. Elizabeth Allan 1908-1990
Vintage print, 1934

105. Jeannette MacDonald 1901-65
Vintage print, 7 September 1934

106. Paulette Goddard (Marion Levy) 1910-90
Modern print from original negative, 1931

107. Chico 1886-1961, Groucho 1890-1977 and Harpo 1888-1964 Marx (The Marx Brothers)
Modern print from original negative, 13 September 1935

108. The Marx Brothers
Vintage print, 13 September 1935

109. Jean Harlow 1911-37 and Clark Gable 1901-60
For Saratoga
Modern print from original negative, 27 May 1937

110. Jean Harlow 1911-37 and Clark Gable 1901-60
For Saratoga
Vintage print, 27 May 1937

111. Myrna Loy (Myrna Williams) 1905-93 and William Powell 1892-1984
Modern print from original negative, 1936

112. Luise Rainer born 1910
As O-Lan in The Good Earth
Vintage print, 1937

113. Greta Garbo 1905-90
For Ninotchka
Modern print from original negative, 9 August 1939

114. Robert Taylor (Spangler Arlington Brugh) 1911-69 and Hedy Lamarr (Hedwig Kiesler) 1913-2000
For Lady of the Tropics
Vintage print, 1939

115. Marlene Dietrich (Maria Magdalena von Losch) 1901-92
Vintage print, c. 1938

116. Jeanette MacDonald 1902-65 and Nelson Eddy 1901-67
For Bitter Sweet
Vintage print, 1940

117. Harry James 1916-83
Modern print from original negative, 1943

118. Eleanor Powell 1910-82 and Fred Astaire (Frederick Austerlitz) 1899-1987
For Broadway Melody of 1940
Modern print from original negative, 21 September 1939

119. Cary Grant (Alexander Archibald Leach) 1904-86
Modern print from original negative, 9 November 1943

120. Katharine Hepburn 1907-2003
For Woman of the Year
Modern print from original negative, 27 October 1941

121. Spencer Tracey 1900-67 and Katharine Hepburn 1907-2003
For Without Love
Vintage print, 7 December 1949

122. Katharine Hepburn 1907-2003
For The Philadelphia Story
Vintage print, 17 August 1940

123. Hedy Lamarr 1913-2000
Vintage print, 1938

124. Hedy Lamarr 1913-2000
Vintage print, 1939

125. Hedy Lamarr 1913-2000
Vintage print, 1938

126. Ava Gardner 1922-90
Modern print from original negative, 20 August 1947
x35327

127. Judy Garland (Frances Gumm) 1922-69
For Presenting Lily Mars
Modern print from original negative, 9 November 1943

128. Lana Turner (Julia Mildred Frances Turner) 1921-95 and Clark Gable 1901-60
For Honky Tonk
Vintage print, 28 October 1943

129. Robert Mitchum 1917-97
Modern print from original negative, June 1946

130. Ava Gardner 1922-90
Vintage colour print, 1947

131. Edmund Gwenn 1875-1949 and Pal (1940-54) as Lassie
For Lassie Come Home
Vintage print, 1943

132. Greer Garson 1908-1996
Vintage print 1940

133. Angela Lansbury born 1925
Vintage print, 1947

134. Lana Turner 1920-95
Modern print from original negative, 28 October 1943

135. Joan Greenwood 1921-87
Vintage print, August 1954

136. Grace Kelly 1929-82
For The Swan
Vintage print, 1956

137. Louis Jourdan (Louis Gendre) born 1921, Leslie Caron born 1931 and Maurice Chevalier 1888-1972
For Gigi
Vintage print, 1958

138. Leslie Caron born 1931
Vintage colour print, 1953

139. Claire Bloom born 1931
Modern print from original transparency, 1958

140. Elizabeth Taylor born 1932
Vintage colour print, 1948

141. Louis B. Mayer and 64 MGM stars for the studio’s 20th birthday party. Left to right. Front row: James Stewart, Margaret Sullavan, Lucille Ball, Hedy Lamarr, Katharine Hepburn, Louis B. Mayer, Greer Garson, Irene Dunne, Susan Peters, Ginny Simms, Lionel Barrymore. Second row: Harry James, Brian Donlevy, Red Skelton, Mickey Rooney, William Powell, Wallace Beery, Spencer Tracy, Walter Pidgeon, Robert Taylor, Pierre Aumont, Lewis Stone, Gene Kelly, Jackie Jenkins. Third row: Tommy Dorsey, George Murphy, Jean Rogers, James Craig, Donna Reed, Van Johnson, Fay Bainter, Marsha Hunt, Ruth Hussey, Marjorie Main, Robert Benchley. Fourth row: Dame May Whitty, Reginald Owen, Keenan Wynn, Diana Lewis, Marilyn Maxwell, Esther Williams, Ann Richards, Martha Linden, Lee Bowman, Richard Carlson, Mary Astor. Fifth row: Blanche Ring, Sara Haden, Fay Holden, Bert Lahr, Frances Gifford, June Allyson, Richard Whorf, Frances Rafferty Spring Byington, Connie Gilchrist, Gladys Cooper. Sixth row: Ben Blue, Chill Wills, Keye Luke, Barry Nelson, Desi Arnaz, Henry O’Neill, Bob Crosby, Rags Ragland.

Modern print from original transparency, 1943

142. Grace Kelly 1929-82
For High Society
Modern print from original colour transparency, 1956

143. Greta Garbo 1905-90
For Two-Faced Woman
Vintage colour print, 1941

144. Lucille Ball 1911-89
Vintage colour print, 1943

145. Cyd Charisse (Tula Ellice Finklea) 1921-2008
Vintage colour print, 1947

146. Greta Garbo 1905-90
For The Painted Veil
Modern print from original negative, 12 September 1934

147. Greta Garbo 1905-90
For The Kiss
Modern print from original negative, 27 August 1929

148. Greta Garbo 1905-90
For Queen Christina
Modern print from original negative, 25 October 1933

149. Greta Garbo 1905-90
For Mata Hari
Modern print from original negative, 19 November 1931

150. Greta Garbo 1905-90
For Queen Christina
Vintage print, 25 October 1933

151. Greta Garbo 1905-90
For Mata Hari
Vintage print, 19 November 1931