Religion

Few of Gillray's satires aim their barbs directly at religion, but many include it as an element. The introduction of the Pope to the convocation at Oxford, by the Cardinal Broad-Bottom (D12933) reflects concern over the Marquess of Buckingham’s Catholic sympathies when he was installed as Chancellor of the University of Oxford. As well as suggesting Buckinghams perceived intentions, Gillray cannot resist poking fun at the figures of the notoriously plump Marquess and his family, the shapes of whose bodies he reveals through their clothes. In this print, Gillray hides Napoleon under the Pope's cloak, but this close association does not reflect reality: in fact the Pope had excommunicated Napoleon.

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William Markham ('The church militant')
by James Gillray, published by William Humphrey
published 5 September 1779
NPG D12279

'The liberty of the subject'
by James Gillray, published by William Humphrey
published 15 October 1779
NPG D12280

'John Bull triumphant'
by James Gillray, published by William Humphrey
published 4 January 1780
NPG D12283

'Argus'
by James Gillray, published by W. Renegal
published 15 May 1780
NPG D12284

'Tom Jones, Partridge and the Beggar'
by James Gillray, published by Thomas Macklin
published 14 September 1780
NPG D12285

'Sophia, Honour and the Chambermaid'
by James Gillray, published by Thomas Macklin
published 1 August 1780
NPG D12286

'National discourse'
probably by James Gillray, published by William Humphrey
published 9 August 1780
NPG D12287

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