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William Allen (1770-1843), Chemist and philanthropist

Sitter in 9 portraits
Allen began working for the Plough Court Pharmacy in the 1790s and was offered a partnership in the business. In 1807, his research on carbon enabled him to be elected a Fellow of the Royal Society, bringing him into contact with many pre-eminent scientists of the day. In 1841 he co-founded and became the first president of The Pharmaceutical Society. Allen's interests, however, moved from science to philanthropy and he became engaged in various schemes of social and penal improvement. He had been interested from childhood in the anti-slavery campaign; in 1807 he became an active member of the African Institution, agitating for the abolition of black slavery in Sierra Leone and the West Indies.

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599

The Anti-Slavery Society Convention, 1840

by Benjamin Robert Haydon
oil on canvas, 1841
On display in Room 20 at the National Portrait Gallery
NPG 599

1075

Men of Science Living in 1807-8

by Sir John Gilbert, and Frederick John Skill, and William Walker, and Elizabeth Walker (née Reynolds)
pencil and wash, 1858-1862
NPG 1075

1075a

Engraving after 'Men of Science Living in 1807-8'

by George Zobel, and William Walker
engraving, 1862
NPG 1075a

D7334

William Allen

by Charles Baugniet, printed by Day & Haghe, after Thomas Francis Dicksee
lithograph, (1843)
NPG D7334

D973

William Allen

after Thomas Francis Dicksee
lithograph, (1843)
NPG D973

D23546

'The Abolition of the Slave Trade' (The Anti-Slavery Society Convention, 1840)

by John Alfred Vinter, after Benjamin Robert Haydon
lithograph, circa 1846-1864 (1841)
NPG D23546

D20516

'The Abolition of the Slave Trade' (The Anti-Slavery Society Convention, 1840)

by John Alfred Vinter, after Benjamin Robert Haydon
lithograph, circa 1846-1864 (1841)
NPG D20516

D32033

'The Abolition of the Slave Trade' (The Anti-Slavery Society Convention, 1840)

by John Alfred Vinter, after Benjamin Robert Haydon
lithograph, circa 1846-1864 (1841)
NPG D32033