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Amy Johnson (1903-1941), Airwoman

Amy Johnson (later Mollison)

Sitter in 26 portraits
Aviator. Johnson was brought up in Hull and graduated from Sheffield University in 1925. She learned to fly and qualified as a ground-engineer in 1929. The following year she flew solo to Australia in nineteen days, winning a £10,000 prize offered by the Daily Mail. This was followed by record-breaking flights to Tokyo via Siberia in nine days in 1931 and to Cape Town in 1932. She married the American pioneer aviator Jim Mollison in 1932. Together they flew to Karachi in 1934 and to the Cape and back in 1936. As a woman, she was ineligible to fly with the RAF in World War Two and joined the Air Transport Auxiliary. She was drowned after baling out of her Airspeed Oxford over the Thames Estuary.

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x3572

Amy Johnson

by Howard Coster
half-plate film negative, 1937
NPG x3572

x3573

Amy Johnson

by Howard Coster
half-plate film negative, 1937
NPG x3573

x3574

Amy Johnson

by Howard Coster
half-plate film negative, 1937
NPG x3574

x3575

Amy Johnson

by Howard Coster
half-plate film negative, 1937
NPG x3575

x193436

Amy Johnson

by Unknown photographer
halftone reproduction tear sheet, published 21 May 1930
NPG x193436

x24041

Amy Johnson

by Howard Coster
bromide print, 1938
NPG x24041

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