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Thomas Killigrew (1612-1683), Dramatist and courtier

Sitter in 15 portraits
The son of a courtier of James I, Killigrew became a page to King Charles I at about the age of thirteen. Before the English civil war, he wrote several plays including his most popular work, The Parson's Wedding (1637). A Royalist, in 1647 he followed Prince Charles into exile and travelled around Europe with him. At the Restoration in 1660, Charles rewarded his loyalty by making him Groom of the Bedchamber. He was given a royal warrant in 1660 to form a theatre company, which gave him a key role in the revival of English drama at that time. His company performed many of Shakespeare's works, in rewritten forms that were popular at the time but disparaged later.

List Thumbnail

892

Thomas Killigrew

after Sir Anthony van Dyck
oil on canvas, (circa 1635)
NPG 892

3795

Thomas Killigrew

by William Sheppard
oil on canvas, 1650
NPG 3795

D3490

Thomas Killigrew

by Ignatius Joseph van den Berghe, after William Sheppard
stipple engraving, (1650)
NPG D3490

D22824

Thomas Killigrew

by William Faithorne, after William Sheppard
line engraving, published 1664 (1650)
NPG D22824

D22825

Thomas Killigrew

by William Faithorne, after William Sheppard
line engraving, published 1664 (1650)
NPG D22825

D22826

Thomas Killigrew

by William Faithorne, after William Sheppard
line engraving, published 1664 (1650)
NPG D22826

D22827

Thomas Killigrew

by William Faithorne, after William Sheppard
line engraving, published 1664 (1650)
NPG D22827

D30004

Thomas Killigrew

by William Faithorne, after William Sheppard
line engraving, published 1664
NPG D30004

D19236

Thomas Killigrew

by William Faithorne, after William Sheppard
line engraving, published 1664 (1650)
NPG D19236

D30008

Thomas Killigrew

by John Collins
line engraving, late 17th century
NPG D30008

D30009

Thomas Killigrew

by Frederick Hendrik van Hove
line engraving, late 17th century
NPG D30009

D11949

Thomas Killigrew

by Jan van der Vaart, published by John Smith, after William Wissing
mezzotint, circa 1674-1686
NPG D11949

D30005

Thomas Killigrew

by Ignatius Joseph van den Berghe, after William Sheppard
stipple engraving, late 18th to early 19th century
NPG D30005

D30006

Thomas Killigrew

by Edward Scriven, after William Sheppard
stipple engraving, published 1810
NPG D30006

D3518

Thomas Killigrew

after William Sheppard
pencil, (1650)
NPG D3518

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