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Henry Berthoud

(1790-1864), Painter and printmaker

Artist associated with 5 portraits

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James Pimbury Wilkinson as Michael in Arnold and Addison's 'Free and Easy', by Robert Cooper, published by  Henry Berthoud, after  George Clint - NPG D4806

James Pimbury Wilkinson as Michael in Arnold and Addison's 'Free and Easy'

by Robert Cooper, published by Henry Berthoud, after George Clint
hand-coloured stipple engraving, published 17 May 1822
NPG D4806

Edward Knight as Hodge in Bickerstaff's 'Love in a Village', by F. Waldeck, published by  Henry Berthoud, after  W. Foster - NPG D8452

Edward Knight as Hodge in Bickerstaff's 'Love in a Village'

by F. Waldeck, published by Henry Berthoud, after W. Foster
hand-coloured lithograph, published 1822
NPG D8452

Henry Gatti as Monsieur Marbleu in Moncrieff's 'Monsieur Tonson', by Robert Cooper, published by  Henry Berthoud, after  Michael William Sharp - NPG D8586

Henry Gatti as Monsieur Marbleu in Moncrieff's 'Monsieur Tonson'

by Robert Cooper, published by Henry Berthoud, after Michael William Sharp
stipple engraving, published 1 March 1822
NPG D8586

Henry Gatti as Monsieur Marbleu in Moncrieff's 'Monsieur Tonson', by Robert Cooper, published by  Henry Berthoud, after  Michael William Sharp - NPG D8587

Henry Gatti as Monsieur Marbleu in Moncrieff's 'Monsieur Tonson'

by Robert Cooper, published by Henry Berthoud, after Michael William Sharp
hand-coloured stipple engraving, published 1 March 1822
NPG D8587

Henry Gatti as Monsieur Marbleu in Moncrieff's 'Monsieur Tonson', by Robert Cooper, published by  Henry Berthoud, after  Michael William Sharp - NPG D8588

Henry Gatti as Monsieur Marbleu in Moncrieff's 'Monsieur Tonson'

by Robert Cooper, published by Henry Berthoud, after Michael William Sharp
stipple engraving, published 1 March 1822
NPG D8588

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Derrick DEANE

20 October 2016, 18:21

I believe there has been a misattribution to these portraits. Henry Berthoud (1794-1864) was the son of Daniel-Henri Berthoud (1766-1836) of Fleurier, Canton Neuchâtel, Switzerland, and Anne Wiswall of London. Daniel-Henri (always known as Henry and later Henry Sr.) had worked in the family's watchmaking outlet in Paris, before moving to England in 1790 to open a similar branch in London. When this failed, he established c.1806 a publishing firm at Regent's Quadrant, Piccadilly, together with opening a number of bookshops in the Soho area. The firm was reputed for its multilingual and fairly esoteric publications, including on theatre and ethnography (e.g. Mayan). I am certain that it is he, and not his son, who should be credited with publishing the above portraits.
Henry Sr. was naturalized British in May 1799. He had married Anne Wiswall at St. George, Camden, in June 1793, with 6 children following. Unfortunately, his business acumen was never strong and the publishing house went into bankruptcy in the late 1820's. He then returned to Fleurier where he died on 26 February 1838, aged 71.
Henry Berthoud Jr. was born on 8 April 1794 at London (Camden). From about 1820, he was working in his father's enterprise as artist-engraver (e.g. "The Brigand's Wife" in 1828). In November 1818, he married Marianne Flieguer at St. Anne, Soho, with a daughter Maria following in May 1821. Sadly, both his wife and daughter died prematurely, Marianne in June 1822 and Maria in 1836.
Henry Jr. had become an associate in his father's enterprises and was involved in their bankruptcy, even being committed to Fleet Prison at end 1828. He then resettled in Paris, although continuing work in London. In October 1844, he remarried, to Elisabeth Marie Chomel, who predeceased him. There were apparently no children. Henry Jr. himself died on 25 September 1864, at his residence just off Place Pigalle.
It is worth a mention that one of Henry Jr.'s sisters, Ann Berthoud (b. 1807), married her first cousin Auguste Louis Berthoud in 1827 and their son Auguste Henri Berthoud became a distinguished Swiss landscape painter.

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