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John Newton (1725-1807), Divine and friend of the poet William Cowper

Sitter in 7 portraits
Newton is best known as an evangelical divine and author of the popular hymn Amazing Grace. A friend of the philanthropist and anti-slave trade campaigner William Wilberforce, Newton had in fact started his career in the 1750s as the captain of a slave ship. Originally from Liverpool, the centre of the British slave trade, Newton travelled between the African coast and the British West Indies, transporting his human cargo in typically squalid conditions. He later repented his involvement in the slaving business and became a prominent spokesman for its abolition. He became friends with the poet William Cowper and nursed him during his bouts of madness.

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D5352

John Newton

by Joseph Collyer the Younger, after John Russell
line engraving, published 1 January 1808 (1788)
NPG D5352

D5353

John Newton

by Joseph Collyer the Younger, after John Russell
line engraving, published 1 January 1808 (1788)
NPG D5353

D5354

John Newton

by Joseph Collyer the Younger, after John Russell
line engraving, published 1 January 1808 (1788)
NPG D5354

D5355

John Newton

by Joseph Collyer the Younger, after John Russell
line engraving, published 1 January 1808 (1788)
NPG D5355

D16282

John Newton

by Joseph Collyer the Younger, after John Russell
line engraving, published 1 January 1808 (1788)
NPG D16282

D16069

John Newton

published by John Payne, after John Russell
stipple engraving, published 11 March 1791
NPG D16069

D19763

John Newton

by Joseph Collyer the Younger, published by J. Smith, after John Russell
line engraving, published 1 January 1808 (1788)
NPG D19763