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Sir Thomas Fowell Buxton, 1st Bt (1786-1845), Philanthropist

Sitter in 13 portraits
In 1808 Buxton began working for the London brewery Truman, Hanbury & Company. Three years later he was appointed a partner and subsequently became its owner. A member of the Church of England, Buxton also attended Quaker meetings and became involved in the social reform movement, helping raise money for the London weavers who were forced into poverty by new factories. He also provided financial support for Elizabeth Fry's prison reform work, and became a member of her Association for the Improvement of the Female Prisoners in Newgate. As an MP from 1818 Buxton worked for changes in prison conditions, criminal law and for the abolition of slavery and capital punishment.

List Thumbnail

54

The House of Commons, 1833

by Sir George Hayter
oil on canvas, 1833-1843
On display in Room 20 at the National Portrait Gallery
NPG 54

599

The Anti-Slavery Society Convention, 1840

by Benjamin Robert Haydon
oil on canvas, 1841
On display in Room 20 at the National Portrait Gallery
NPG 599

D20845

Sir Thomas Fowell Buxton, 1st Bt

by James Thomson (Thompson), after Abraham Wivell
stipple engraving, (1821)
NPG D20845

D41204

New West-India Dance, to the Tune of 20 Millions

by John ('HB') Doyle, printed by Alfred Ducôte, published by Thomas McLean
lithograph, published 18 June 1833
NPG D41204

D7833

Sir Thomas Fowell Buxton, 1st Bt

by William Holl Sr, or by William Holl Jr, after Henry Perronet Briggs
stipple engraving, published 1835
NPG D7833

D41433

Great Western General Booking Office

by John ('HB') Doyle, printed by Alfred Ducôte, published by Thomas McLean
lithograph, published 31 August 1837
NPG D41433

D41473

The Age of Leetle Men

by John ('HB') Doyle, printed by Alfred Ducôte, published by Thomas McLean
lithograph, published 26 May 1838
NPG D41473

D32511

Sir Thomas Fowell Buxton, 1st Bt

by John Brain, after Sir George Hayter
stipple engraving, published 1840
NPG D32511

D23546

'The Abolition of the Slave Trade' (The Anti-Slavery Society Convention, 1840)

by John Alfred Vinter, after Benjamin Robert Haydon
lithograph, circa 1846-1864 (1841)
NPG D23546

D20516

'The Abolition of the Slave Trade' (The Anti-Slavery Society Convention, 1840)

by John Alfred Vinter, after Benjamin Robert Haydon
lithograph, circa 1846-1864 (1841)
NPG D20516

D9338

Heroes of the Slave Trade Abolition

by Unknown artist
wood engraving, mid-late 19th century
NPG D9338

D32033

'The Abolition of the Slave Trade' (The Anti-Slavery Society Convention, 1840)

by John Alfred Vinter, after Benjamin Robert Haydon
lithograph, circa 1846-1864 (1841)
NPG D32033

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