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Elizabeth Carter (1717-1806), Scholar and writer

Sitter associated with 9 portraits
Encouraged by her father, a clergyman, to study, Carter applied herself with such perseverance that she became one of the most learned Englishwoman of her time, being mistress of Latin, Greek, Hebrew, and Arabic, besides several modern European languages. She rendered into English De Crousaz's Examen de l'essai de Monsieur Pope sur l'homme (1739); Algarotti's Newtonianismo per le Donne; the works of Epictetus (1758) and wrote a volume of poems. An icon of virtue and learning, Carter was later sought out by aspiring women writers, including the literary critic Elizabeth Montagu, with whom she developed a lifelong friendship and helped to establish the Bluestocking Circle.

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L242

Elizabeth Carter ('Elizabeth Carter as Minerva')

by John Fayram
oil on canvas, circa 1735-1741
On display in Room 10 at the National Portrait Gallery
NPG L242

4905

Portraits in the Characters of the Muses in the Temple of Apollo

by Richard Samuel
oil on canvas, exhibited 1779
On display in Room 12 at the National Portrait Gallery
NPG 4905

28

Elizabeth Carter

by Sir Thomas Lawrence
pastel on vellum, 1788-1789
NPG 28

D4998

Unknown sitter called Elizabeth Carter

by John Raphael Smith, published by James Birchall, after John Kitchingman
mezzotint, published 3 July 1781
NPG D4998

D13793

Elizabeth Carter

by Mackenzie, after Joachim Smith
stipple engraving, published 1 May 1807
NPG D13793

D32713

Elizabeth Carter

by Caroline Watson, after Sir Thomas Lawrence
stipple engraving, published 1808 (1788-1789)
NPG D32713

D13647

Elizabeth Carter

published by Dean & Munday, after Joachim Smith
stipple engraving, published 1 August 1821
NPG D13647

D13648

Elizabeth Carter

published by Dean & Munday, after Joachim Smith
stipple engraving, published 1 August 1821
NPG D13648

D14162

Elizabeth Carter

by Joseph Brown, published by Richard Bentley
line and stipple engraving, published 1861
NPG D14162