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Sir Francis Leggatt Chantrey (1781-1841), Sculptor

Sitter in 11 portraits
Artist associated with 267 portraits
The most outstanding sculptor of his generation, Chantrey executed portrait busts, public monuments and memorials. His success was the result of his study of character, combining direct observation with simplicity of form. Chantrey had little formal training. He was born of a poor family in Sheffield and only established himself in fashionable society in 1809 when he married into money and set up a studio in London. In 1811, the exhibition of his bust of the radical John Horne Tooke made his name. For the rest of his life Chantrey never wanted for commissions. He bequeathed his fortune for the establishment of a 'public national collection of British fine art', the foundation of the Tate Gallery.

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2103a

Sir Francis Leggatt Chantrey

by Sir Francis Leggatt Chantrey
pencil and grey wash, circa 1800
NPG 2103a

654

Sir Francis Leggatt Chantrey

by Sir Francis Leggatt Chantrey
chalk, circa 1802
NPG 654

86

Sir Francis Leggatt Chantrey

by Thomas Phillips
oil on panel, 1818
On display in Room 17 at the National Portrait Gallery
NPG 86

5380

Sir Francis Leggatt Chantrey

by John Raphael Smith
pastel, probably 1818
NPG 5380

D20286

Sir Francis Leggatt Chantrey

by Thomas Fairland, published by Marseille Middleton Holloway, after Henry Weekes
lithograph, published 6 December 1841 (1839)
NPG D20286

D32855

Sir Francis Leggatt Chantrey

by Charles Turner, after Sir Henry Raeburn
mezzotint, published 1843
NPG D32855

D32856

Sir Francis Leggatt Chantrey

by Charles Turner, after Sir Henry Raeburn
mezzotint, published 1843
NPG D32856

D2912

Sir Francis Leggatt Chantrey; James Watt (on reverse)

by William Wyon, after William Bain, and after Sir Francis Leggatt Chantrey
bronze medal, 1843
NPG D2912

D17472

Sir Francis Leggatt Chantrey

by Henry Bone, after John Jackson
pencil drawing squared in ink for transfer, 1831 (exhibited 1830)
NPG D17472