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Rowland Hill (1744-1833), Evangelical preacher

Sitter in 18 portraits
Rowland Hill was a leading evangelical preacher and a close friend of the portraitist John Russell. Hill was an early supporter of the Sunday School Movement at a time of national emphasis on the religious education of working class children to keep them out of trouble and avoid sin at an early age. In 1783, he opened Surrey Chapel in London's Blackfriars Road to which thirteen Sunday schools were attached, catering for over 3,000 children.

List Thumbnail

1464

Rowland Hill

by John Russell
pastel, circa 1780
NPG 1464

1401

Rowland Hill

by Unknown artist
plaster cast of bust, 1800s or 1810s
NPG 1401

5397

Rowland Hill

by Samuel Mountjoy Smith
oil on canvas, 1828
NPG 5397

D35840

Rowland Hill

published by Carington Bowles
line engraving, after 1763
NPG D35840

D35839

Rowland Hill

published by Carington Bowles
mezzotint, published 31 August 1773
NPG D35839

D3050

Rowland Hill

published by Carington Bowles
mezzotint, published 31 August 1773
NPG D3050

D13800

Rowland Hill

by Joseph Collyer the Younger, after John Russell
stipple engraving, published 1783
NPG D13800

D13801

Rowland Hill

by John Kay
etching, 1798
NPG D13801

D35838

Rowland Hill

by Barlow, published by and after J. Ker
stipple and line engraving, published 3 August 1808
NPG D35838

D35845

Rowland Hill

by Samuel Freeman, after William Derby
stipple engraving, 1820s-1830s
NPG D35845

D35842

Rowland Hill

by Samuel Freeman, published by Thomas Tegg, after William Derby
stipple engraving, published 2 May 1825
NPG D35842

D35843

Rowland Hill

by Samuel Freeman, published by Thomas Tegg, after William Derby
stipple engraving, published 2 May 1825
NPG D35843

D35841

Rowland Hill

by and published by John Linnell
etching, published March 1827
NPG D35841

D19930

Rowland Hill

by and published by John Linnell
etching, published March 1827
NPG D19930

D35846

Rowland Hill

by Thomas Goff Lupton, published by Smith & Son, after Samuel Mountjoy Smith
mezzotint, published 1 September 1828 (1828)
NPG D35846

D3051

Rowland Hill

by Thomas Goff Lupton, published by Smith & Son, after Samuel Mountjoy Smith
mezzotint, published 1 September 1828 (1828)
NPG D3051

D35844

Rowland Hill

by Samuel Freeman, published by Page & Son, after William Derby
stipple engraving, published 1 February 1831
NPG D35844

D18902

Rowland Hill

published by Carington Bowles
mezzotint, published 1773
NPG D18902

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