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Sir Henry Lee (1533-1611), Master of the Ordnance

Sitter in 5 portraits
A favourite of Queen Elizabeth I, Lee was the originator of the annual Accession Day Tilts on 17 November; chivalric events in honour of the Queen, and the most important Elizabethan court festival from at least 1581. He was the first person to hold the office of Queen's Champion, which he resigned in 1590. Lee later patronised the artist Marcus Gheeraerts the Younger to paint the 'Ditchley portrait' of Elizabeth I. His epitaph records him as a man who served 'five succeeding princes, and kept himself right and steady in the many dangerous shocks and utter turns of state'.

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2095

Sir Henry Lee

by Anthonis Mor (Antonio Moro)
oil on panel, 1568
On display in Room 2 at the National Portrait Gallery
NPG 2095

D25364

Sir Henry Lee

by James Basire, after Moses Griffith
line engraving, published 1790
NPG D25364

D37237

Sir Henry Lee

by James Basire, after Moses Griffith
line engraving, published 1790
NPG D37237

D21016

Sir Henry Lee

by James Basire, after Moses Griffith
line engraving, published 1790
NPG D21016

D17123

Sir Henry Lee

by Henry Bone
pencil drawing squared in ink for transfer, August 1822
NPG D17123

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