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Harriet Martineau (1802-1876), Social philosopher and writer; sister of James Martineau

Sitter in 8 portraits
Martineau had a difficult childhood, dogged by poverty and ill health, she became deaf at a young age and had to use an ear trumpet. To earn money for her family she sent out articles, stories and poems to magazines, with some of her pieces bringing financial success. Her trip to America in 1834 arose from her abhorrence of slavery. She travelled around the south unharmed, but met hostility further north and had to abandon her visit in 1835, writing Society in America (1837) to describe her experiences. She also wrote How to Observe Morals and Manners (1838) to advise other would-be travellers. Back home she was ridiculed for her growing interest in mesmerism (hypnosis).

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1085

Harriet Martineau

by Richard Evans
oil on canvas, exhibited 1834
On display in the Ladies Drawing Room at Bodelwyddan Castle
NPG 1085

1796

Harriet Martineau

by George Richmond
chalk, 1849
NPG 1796

P511

Harriet Martineau

by Moses Bowness
albumen print, 1860s
NPG P511

P33

Harriet Martineau

by Camille Silvy
albumen print, 1 March 1861
NPG P33

x21222

Harriet Martineau

by Moses Bowness
albumen carte-de-visite, 1860s
NPG x21222

Ax51674

Harriet Martineau

by Camille Silvy
albumen print, 1 March 1861
NPG Ax51674

D34543

Harriet Martineau

after Daniel Maclise
pen and ink, (published 1833)
NPG D34543

D38300

Harriet Martineau

by Francis Holl, after George Richmond
stipple engraving, (1849)
NPG D38300