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Robert Mylne (1733-1811), Architect and civil engineer

Sitter in 9 portraits
Mylne came from a distinguished family of masons to the Scottish crown. He studied architecture in Paris and Rome and became part of the community of artists associated with British aristocrats on the 'grand tour'. He returned to London in 1759 and won a competition to design Blackfriars Bridge over the River Thames. The design, with its novel elliptical arches, excited much interest both in Britain and Europe and was said to rival the Rialto in Venice. Mylne's bridge, which opened in 1769, became one of London's major landmarks and was to remain his masterpiece. Its prominence generated many other commissions for him, both for architecture and for engineering. The bridge was replaced in the 1860s.

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1150

Robert Mylne

by George Dance
pencil, 1795
NPG 1150

1075

Men of Science Living in 1807-8

by Sir John Gilbert, and Frederick John Skill, and William Walker, and Elizabeth Walker (née Reynolds)
pencil and wash, 1858-1862
NPG 1075

1075a

Engraving after 'Men of Science Living in 1807-8'

by George Zobel, and William Walker
engraving, 1862
NPG 1075a

D5326

Robert Mylne

by Vincenzio Vangelisti, after Richard Brompton
line engraving, 1783 (1783)
NPG D5326

D20246

Robert Mylne

by Vincenzio Vangelisti, after Richard Brompton
line engraving, 1783 (1783)
NPG D20246

D12088

Robert Mylne

by William Daniell, after George Dance
soft-ground etching, published 15 March 1810 (1795)
NPG D12088

D12149

Robert Mylne

by William Daniell, after George Dance
soft-ground etching, published 15 March 1810 (1795)
NPG D12149

D13994

Robert Mylne

by William Daniell, after George Dance
soft-ground etching, published 15 March 1810 (1795)
NPG D13994