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Wendell Phillips (1811-1884), American slavery abolitionist

Sitter in 4 portraits
Wendell Phillips was an American abolitionist crusader whose eloquent speeches helped fire the antislavery cause during the period leading up to the American Civil War. Trained in the law, Phillips abandoned his legal career in order to join the antislavery movement. He became a close associate of the abolitionist leader William Lloyd Garrison and began lecturing for antislavery societies, writing pamphlets and editorials for Garrison's The Liberator, and contributing financially to the abolition movement. Phillips became recognised as one of the most brilliant orators of his day. In 1865 he succeeded Garrison as president of the American Anti-Slavery Society.

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599

The Anti-Slavery Society Convention, 1840

by Benjamin Robert Haydon
oil on canvas, 1841
On display in Room 20 at the National Portrait Gallery
NPG 599

D23546

'The Abolition of the Slave Trade' (The Anti-Slavery Society Convention, 1840)

by John Alfred Vinter, after Benjamin Robert Haydon
lithograph, circa 1846-1864 (1841)
NPG D23546

D20516

'The Abolition of the Slave Trade' (The Anti-Slavery Society Convention, 1840)

by John Alfred Vinter, after Benjamin Robert Haydon
lithograph, circa 1846-1864 (1841)
NPG D20516

D32033

'The Abolition of the Slave Trade' (The Anti-Slavery Society Convention, 1840)

by John Alfred Vinter, after Benjamin Robert Haydon
lithograph, circa 1846-1864 (1841)
NPG D32033