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Louisa Fairbrother ('Mrs FitzGeorge')

(1816-1890), Actress; wife of Prince George, 2nd Duke of Cambridge

Sitter in 4 portraits

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Louisa Fairbrother ('Mrs FitzGeorge') as Columbine, by Richard James Lane, printed by  Jérémie Graf, published by  John Mitchell, after  Alfred Edward Chalon - NPG D22106

Louisa Fairbrother ('Mrs FitzGeorge') as Columbine

by Richard James Lane, printed by Jérémie Graf, published by John Mitchell, after Alfred Edward Chalon
hand-coloured lithograph, published December 1839
NPG D22106

Louisa Fairbrother ('Mrs FitzGeorge') as Columbine, by Richard James Lane, printed by  Jérémie Graf, published by  John Mitchell, after  Alfred Edward Chalon - NPG D22385

Louisa Fairbrother ('Mrs FitzGeorge') as Columbine

by Richard James Lane, printed by Jérémie Graf, published by John Mitchell, after Alfred Edward Chalon
lithograph, published December 1839
NPG D22385

Miss Fairbrother as Abdallah in The Forty-Thieves (Louisa Fairbrother ('Mrs FitzGeorge')), by John Brandard, published by  Messrs Fores, published by  Goupil & Vibert, after  James Warren Childe - NPG D36631

Miss Fairbrother as Abdallah in The Forty-Thieves (Louisa Fairbrother ('Mrs FitzGeorge'))

by John Brandard, published by Messrs Fores, published by Goupil & Vibert, after James Warren Childe
hand-coloured lithograph, published 2 January 1845
NPG D36631

Miss Fairbrother as Abdallah in The Forty-Thieves (Louisa Fairbrother ('Mrs FitzGeorge')), by John Brandard, printed by  M & N Hanhart, published by  Messrs Fores, published by  Goupil & Vibert, after  James Warren Childe - NPG D36632

Miss Fairbrother as Abdallah in The Forty-Thieves (Louisa Fairbrother ('Mrs FitzGeorge'))

by John Brandard, printed by M & N Hanhart, published by Messrs Fores, published by Goupil & Vibert, after James Warren Childe
hand-coloured lithograph, published 2 January 1845
NPG D36632

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Mrs Tracy Barker

12 January 2017, 23:39

One of Dr. Henry Earle's daughters married a publisher of the name of Farebrother. They had a very remarkable daughter, Louisa Sarah by name. She was highly intelligent and talented, but rather in advance of her times. Coming from a line of such distinguished royal physicians it was no wonder when she decided to make medicine her career. But, whether it was due to the belief that the medical profession was in that day, unsuitable for a lady, or not, she abruptly changed her mind and went on the stage. Although this brought grief and consternation to her parents, her outstanding talent and beauty caused an immediate sensation. It was at once recognised that Louisa Farebrother was someone special and all society flocked to see her. Among the nobility nightly attending the theatre where she was appearing was His Royal Highness The Duke of Cambridge, first cousin to Queen Victoria. He ardently courted her and after twelve months they were married at St Johns Church, Marylebone, London. Queen Victoria, as was expected, was disdainfully shocked and refused to acknowledge the marriage. Consequently Louisa could not be accepted as the Duchess of Cambridge and was known as Mrs. FitzGeorge. Mrs. FitzGeorge was of gentle birth, highly educated and possessed a gracious and charming personality. She proved for fifty long years a devoted wife and mother. The Queen finally agreed to meet with Mrs FitzGeorge due to the general public and the whole of society including her son the Prince of Wales had accepted her as being no less than Royalty's equal. It certainly says a great deal for Louisa's charm and breeding to record that the prejudiced old Queen was completely won over and the subsequent meetings were frequent.

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