Harvey Aston

1 portrait of Harvey Aston

Harvey Aston, by John Linnell, 1839 - NPG 1818b - © National Portrait Gallery, London

© National Portrait Gallery, London

Harvey Aston

by John Linnell
pencil and crayon, 1839
15 in. x 12 1/2 in. (381 mm x 318 mm)
Purchased, 1918
Primary Collection
NPG 1818b


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Sitterback to top

Artistback to top

  • John Linnell (1792-1882), Painter. Artist associated with 68 portraits, Sitter in 8 portraits.

This portraitback to top

This drawing shows Harvey Aston on his deathbed. Very little is known about Aston or the circumstances of this drawing, but it is likely that his family commissioned Linnell to memorialise him. During the nineteenth-century, the memory of dead loved ones was often perpetuated through paintings, death-masks and busts, which were viewed as therapeutic aids in the process of grieving.

Linked displays and exhibitionsback to top

Events of 1839back to top

Current affairs

The Bedchamber crisis strains relations between the government and the monarchy, after Queen Victoria refuses to dismiss her Whig-appointed ladies of the bedchamber at the request of the new, Conservative Prime Minister Sir Robert Peel. Peel resigns and Melbourne returns as Prime Minister. The Grand National is first held at the Aintree race course, won by the horse Lottery, and the first Henley Royal Regatta, the rowing event, is held on the Thames.

Art and science

The French and British scientists Louis Daguerre and William Henry Fox Talbot separately publicise their experiments with the new form of photography. The prolific journalist Harriet Martineau publishes her three decker novel Deerbrook, the story of middle class country life.

International

The first Opium War with China is sparked after the British government refuses to try six British soldiers accused of killing a Chinese man protecting a temple from looters. Relations were strained as Britain had promoted the drug opium in China to boost trade. Winning the war, Britain secured vital trading rights. African captives aboard the Spanish ship La Amistad revolt, resulting in a highly publicised court case.

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Christopher Talbot-Sim

12 September 2016, 21:43

This is possibly Arthur Wellington Hervey-Aston, 1815-1839, heir to the Aston estate in Cheshire who died unmarried and childless, causing dispute about the descent of the estate that lasted until the late 19th century.

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