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Sir Charles Wentworth Dilke, 2nd Bt

5 of 29 portraits of Sir Charles Wentworth Dilke, 2nd Bt

Sir Charles Wentworth Dilke, 2nd Bt, by William Strang, 1908 - NPG 3819 - © National Portrait Gallery, London

© National Portrait Gallery, London

Sir Charles Wentworth Dilke, 2nd Bt

by William Strang
pencil, 1908
16 1/8 in. x 11 3/4 in. (410 mm x 298 mm)
Bequeathed by the sitter's niece, Gertrude Mary Tuckwell, 1952
Primary Collection
NPG 3819


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Sitterback to top

Artistback to top

  • William Strang (1859-1921), Painter and etcher. Artist associated with 65 portraits, Sitter in 11 portraits.

This portraitback to top

Strang's drawing was made as Dilke's Grillion's Club portrait, fulfilling a tradition of the club that each member should have their likeness made. Strang wrote to Dilke in July 1907 saying that 'there is no one I am more anxious to do successfully than yourself' but the sitting for this drawing had to wait until March 1908.

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Subject/Themeback to top

Events of 1908back to top

Current affairs

Henry Asquith replaces Henry Campbell-Bannerman as Liberal leader and Prime Minister, with David Lloyd George taking control of the Exchequer. Asquith and Lloyd George embark on a bold programme of social reform, laying the foundations of the Welfare State, introducing government pensions this year and later a system of National Insurance. The first aeroplane for the British army is built by the American, Samuel Cody.

Art and science

E.M. Forster's novel A Room with a View is published, following the experiences of a young woman, Lucy Honeydrew, in the repressed culture of Edwardian England. The French art critic Louis Vauxcelles first uses the term 'cubism' to refer to a landscape painting by Georges Braque.

International

King Carlos of Portugal and his heir, Prince Luis Filipe, are killed by assassins from the Republican trying to provoke a revolution. Carlos I, unpopular because of his extravagant lifestyle and extramarital affairs, was succeeded by his younger son, Manuel, the last monarch of the Braganza dynasty. Following the death of the Guangxu Emperor in China, his two year old nephew replaces him, becoming the the last Manchu emperor of China.

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