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Richard Lovell Edgeworth

1 of 2 portraits of Richard Lovell Edgeworth

Richard Lovell Edgeworth, by Horace Hone, 1785 - NPG 5069 - © National Portrait Gallery, London

© National Portrait Gallery, London

Richard Lovell Edgeworth

by Horace Hone
watercolour and bodycolour on ivory, 1785
3 in. x 2 3/8 in. (76 mm x 60 mm) oval
Purchased, 1976
Primary Collection
NPG 5069


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Sitterback to top

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  • Horace Hone (1754-1825), Miniature painter; son of Nathaniel Hone. Artist associated with 8 portraits, Sitter in 1 portrait.

This portraitback to top

Educationalist and father of the novelist Maria Edgeworth, Richard Lovell Edgeworth's Protestant Anglo-Irish family owned an estate confiscated from Irish Catholics by James I. During the Rebellion of 1798, the Edgeworth estate workers rose against their landlord but were suppressed after a bitter struggle. As an Irish MP, Edgeworth campaigned for government control of popular education and between 1806 and 1811 was one of the commissioners appointed by the British government to enquire into public education in Ireland.

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Events of 1785back to top

Current affairs

George Prince of Wales secretly marries his mistress Maria Fitzherbert in contravention of the Royal Marriages Act of 1772. Prime Minister William Pitt introduces a bill proposing parliamentary reform and the abolition of 'rotten boroughs' but is defeated.

Art and science

William Cowper publishes his best -known poem The Task. James Boswell publishes The Journal of a Tour to the Hebrides, narrating his travels with the late writer Samuel Johnson. Physician and naturalist James Hutton presents his studies of local rocks to the Royal Society of Edinburgh, launching the era of scientific geology.

International

Warren Hastings resigns as Governor-General of Bengal and returns to England. His trial begins on charges of corruption in the administration of India. French sculptor Jean Antoine Houdon crosses the Atlantic to sculpt a statue of George Washington. British government establishes a permanent land force in the Eastern Caribbean, based in Barbados.

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