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William Fairfax, 3rd Viscount Fairfax of Emley; Elizabeth (née Smith), Viscountess Fairfax of Emley (later Lady Goodricke)

1 of 3 portraits on display at Tate Britain, London

William Fairfax, 3rd Viscount Fairfax of Emley; Elizabeth (née Smith), Viscountess Fairfax of Emley (later Lady Goodricke), by Gilbert Soest, circa 1645-1648 - NPG 754 - © National Portrait Gallery, London

© National Portrait Gallery, London

William Fairfax, 3rd Viscount Fairfax of Emley; Elizabeth (née Smith), Viscountess Fairfax of Emley (later Lady Goodricke)

by Gilbert Soest
oil on canvas, circa 1645-1648
54 3/4 in. x 68 3/4 in. (1391 mm x 1746 mm)
Purchased, 1886
Primary Collection
NPG 754

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Sittersback to top

Artistback to top

  • Gilbert Soest (circa 1605-1681), Portrait painter. Artist associated with 51 portraits, Sitter in 1 portrait.

Linked publicationsback to top

  • Piper, David, Catalogue of Seventeenth Century Portraits in the National Portrait Gallery, 1625-1714, 1963, p. 123
  • Saywell, David; Simon, Jacob, Complete Illustrated Catalogue, 2004, p. 212

Events of 1645back to top

Current affairs

First proposed by Sir WiIliam Waller, the New Model Army, the first national army consisting of full-time soldiers, is recruited by Parliament. Under the leadership of Thomas Fairfax, Commander-in-Chief, the Army decisively wins the battles of Naseby and Langport against the Royalists. Archbishop William Laud is beheaded for treason.

Art and science

Alexander Ross, clergyman and philosopher publishes The Philosophical Touch-Stone, an important refutation of the unorthodox Aristotelianism expounded by Sir Kenelm Digby in his Two Treaties. Physician Daniel Whistler, presents his thesis on rickets at the Dutch university of Leiden, the first printed text on the disease.


Charles I commissions Edward Somerset, Marquess of Worcester, to secretly negotiate with Irish Confederates. For generous concessions the Confederates would raise an army to fight against parliamentarians. Ongoing, complex negotiations secure the signing of two treaties but the king eventually disavows the agreements and repudiates Somerset.

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