Richard Gibson

1 portrait

Richard Gibson, after Sir Peter Lely, (1658) - NPG 1975 - © National Portrait Gallery, London

© National Portrait Gallery, London

Richard Gibson

after Sir Peter Lely
oil on canvas, (1658)
49 1/2 in. x 40 in. (1257 mm x 1016 mm)
Purchased, 1923
Primary Collection
NPG 1975


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Sitterback to top

  • Richard Gibson (1615-1690), Miniature painter. Sitter in 3 portraits, Artist associated with 2 portraits.

Artistback to top

  • Sir Peter Lely (1618-1680), Portrait painter. Artist associated with 842 portraits, Sitter in 19 portraits.

This portraitback to top

A miniature painter, Gibson began his artistic career under Cleyn at the Mortlake Tapestry Works. Afterwards he worked at the court of Charles I where he met and married Anne Shepherd, known as the 'queen's dwarf'; both husband and wife were 3ft 10 inches tall. Their marriage was commemorated in a poem by Edmund Waller. During the Interregnum, Gibson seems to have worked for Cromwell, and between 1677 and 1688 he was mainly in Holland, where he taught Mary of Orange. In this 'swagger' portrait he rests his right arm on the shoulder of a marble bust of a woman. Gibson fathered nine children, at least three of whom became artists.

Linked publicationsback to top

  • Piper, David, Catalogue of Seventeenth Century Portraits in the National Portrait Gallery, 1625-1714, 1963, p. 136
  • Saywell, David; Simon, Jacob, Complete Illustrated Catalogue, 2004, p. 245

Events of 1658back to top

Current affairs

Lord Protector, Oliver Cromwell dies from pneumonia at Whitehall on 3rd September. His effigy lay in state at Somerset House, the ceremony based upon that of James I. Cromwell's son, Richard Cromwell is nominated Lord Protector. Granddaughter of James I, Princess Sophia marries Ernest Augustus, Elector of Hanover.

Art and science

Puritan divine, Richard Baxter, publishes A Call to the Unconverted, a core text of evangelicalism. Playwright, William Davenant stages his innovative The Cruelty of the Spaniards in Peru, relating to Oliver Cromwell's anti-Spanish policy. Presented as a musical, it circumvents the ban imposed during the Interregnum on dramatic performances.

International

James, Duke of York, fighting alongside his brother, Henry, Duke of Gloucester, commands a Royalist contingent allied to Spanish forces against the armies of England, Holland and France at the Battle of the Dunes. Their defeat ends the prospect of a Royalist invasion of England with Spanish support.

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