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Lord Charles John Innes-Ker

1 of 3 portraits of Lord Charles John Innes-Ker

Lord Charles John Innes-Ker, by Sir Leslie Ward, published in Vanity Fair 20 March 1886 - NPG 4721 - © National Portrait Gallery, London

© National Portrait Gallery, London

Lord Charles John Innes-Ker

by Sir Leslie Ward
watercolour, published in Vanity Fair 20 March 1886
12 1/2 in. x 7 1/2 in. (318 mm x 181 mm)
Purchased, 1970
Primary Collection
NPG 4721


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Sitterback to top

Artistback to top

  • Sir Leslie Ward (1851-1922), 'Spy'; caricaturist and portrait painter; son of Edward Matthew Ward. Artist associated with 1610 portraits, Sitter in 9 portraits.

Linked publicationsback to top

Events of 1886back to top

Current affairs

The Liberals win the election after the Irish Nationalists, including John Dillon, side with them over Home Rule, and Gladstone resumes the seat of Prime Minister. The failure of the first Home Rule Bill divides the Liberal party; those opposed to Home Rule break away to form the Liberal Unionist Party, supporting the Conservatives. This results in a Liberal loss at an emergency election called, and the Marquess of Salisbury becomes Prime Minister for the second time.

Art and science

The Severn Tunnel is opened, freeing up the route between London and South Wales. Pears' soap company buy the copyright to John Millais's painting Bubbles, using it in an iconic and enduringly recognisable advertisement. Millais, however, attracted strong criticism from the art community, who protested against the debasement and commercialisation of art.

International

The American poet Emily Dickinson dies, aged 54. Dickinson wrote over 1,700 poems, which first came to light in 1890, and is recognised as one of America's most important writers. The Statue of Liberty, designed by Frederic Auguste Bartholdi, is erected on Bedloe's island. The huge copper statue, a gift from the French to the United States to commemorate the centennial of American independence, is an iconic figure of liberty, and America itself.

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