Dorothy Jordan

1 portrait

Dorothy Jordan, by John Hoppner, exhibited 1791 - NPG L174 - Tate 2013; on loan to the National Portrait Gallery, London

Tate 2013; on loan to the National Portrait Gallery, London

Dorothy Jordan

by John Hoppner
oil on canvas, exhibited 1791
29 1/2 in. x 24 1/2 in. (749 mm x 622 mm)
Lent by Tate Gallery: London: UK, 1979
Primary Collection
NPG L174


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Sitterback to top

Artistback to top

  • John Hoppner (1758-1810), Painter. Artist associated with 214 portraits, Sitter in 13 portraits.

This portraitback to top

This portrait shows her in one of her most popular 'breeches' roles in Cibber's She Would and She Would Not, where she dresses as a young soldier to follow her lover to Madrid.

Related worksback to top

  • NPG D3324: Dorothy Jordan as Hypolita (source portrait)

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Events of 1791back to top

Current affairs

Thomas Paine publishes his inflammatory and widely read Rights of Man in response to Edmund Burke's Reflections on the Revolution in France of the previous year. The work advocates radical revolution and prompts a trial for seditious libel that takes place in his absence. The Catholic Relief Act is passed, repealing the most severe penal laws.

Art and science

Astronomer William Herschel discovers Uranus. Robert Burns publishes Tam O'Shanter, combining the Scottish vernacular with the formal traditions of classical English poetry and exploring radical ideas of freedom. The Observer newspaper is founded. The Ordnance Survey is set up to prepare detailed maps of the country.

International

Mozart composes The Magic Flute. The Declaration of the Rights of Man establishes liberal freedoms in France The French Constitution is passed by the National Assembly. Louis XVI flees Paris with his family but is captured at Varennes. William Pitt declares Britain will remain neutral in any war against France.

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