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John Michael Rysbrack

1 of 7 portraits of John Michael Rysbrack

John Michael Rysbrack, by John Vanderbank, circa 1728 - NPG 1802 - © National Portrait Gallery, London

© National Portrait Gallery, London

John Michael Rysbrack

by John Vanderbank
oil on canvas, circa 1728
49 1/2 in. x 39 1/2 in. (1257 mm x 1003 mm)
Purchased, 1918
Primary Collection
NPG 1802


Click on the links below to find out more:

Sitterback to top

  • John Michael Rysbrack (1694-1770), Sculptor. Sitter in 7 portraits, Artist associated with 16 portraits.

Artistback to top

  • John Vanderbank (1694-1739), Portrait painter. Artist associated with 96 portraits, Sitter in 1 portrait.

This portraitback to top

Here, Rysbrack is surrounded by classical sculpture; pausing from his work, he holds dividers and a scroll of paper. More detailed information on this portrait is available in a National Portrait Gallery collection catalogue, John Kerslake's Early Georgian Portraits (1977, out of print).

Related worksback to top

  • NPG D18928: John Michael Rysbrack (source portrait)
  • NPG D4144: John Michael Rysbrack (source portrait)
  • NPG D39967: John Michael Rysbrack (source portrait)
  • NPG D39968: John Michael Rysbrack (source portrait)

Linked publicationsback to top

Events of 1728back to top

Current affairs

George II's son Frederick, soon to be Prince of Wales, arrives in Britain for the first time, aged 21. Satirist Jonathan Swift publishes A Short View on the State of Ireland which severely criticises British policy in Ireland. Composer George Frideric Handel is appointed director of the King's Theatre, London.

Art and science

John Gay's The Beggar's Opera debuts at the Lincoln's Inn Fields Theatre, London. First version of Alexander Pope's landmark literary satire The Dunciad is published. Astronomer James Bradley uses stellar aberration to calculate the speed of light and observes the nutation of the Earth's axis.

International

British troops under Sir Charles Wager remain steadfast in Gibraltar and Spain ends its siege. Convention of Prado ends the one-year war between Britain and Spain. Danish explorer Vitus Bering sails into Arctic seas through the strait between Asia and America now known by his name.

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