George Stubbs

1 portrait

George Stubbs, by George Stubbs, 1781 - NPG 4575 - © National Portrait Gallery, London

© National Portrait Gallery, London

George Stubbs

by George Stubbs
enamel on Wedgwood plaque, 1781
27 1/2 in. x 20 7/8 in. (697 mm x 531 mm) oval
Purchased with help from the Art Fund, 1967
Primary Collection
NPG 4575

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Sitterback to top

  • George Stubbs (1724-1806), Painter and anatomist. Sitter in 9 portraits, Artist associated with 6 portraits.

Artistback to top

  • George Stubbs (1724-1806), Painter and anatomist. Artist associated with 6 portraits, Sitter in 9 portraits.

This portraitback to top

The fine neoclassical frame is of a type used by Stubbs for his large enamel paintings in the early 1780s; the design seems to have been originated by Wedgwood with the help of his partner Thomas Bentley and the framemaker Thomas Vials.

Linked publicationsback to top

Events of 1781back to top

Current affairs

American painter John Singleton Copley, now resident in London, completes his celebrated painting The Death of the Earl of Chatham, depicting the collapse of William Pitt, 1st Earl of Chatham on 7 April 1778, during a debate in the House of Lords on the American War of Independence. William Pitt the Younger, later Prime Minister, enters Parliament.

Art and science

Astronomer William Herschel discovers Uranus, the first planet to be found by means of a telescope, and names it Georgium Sidus (George's Star) in honour of George III. Artist and theatre designer Philip James De Loutherbourg presents his innovative miniature mechanical theatre, the Eidophusikon, at his house in Soho, London.


American War of Independence: British general Charles Cornwallis is forced to surrender at Yorktown. Maryland ratifies the Articles of Confederation - the last state to do so - completing 'the Confederation of the United States'. Zong Massacre: 133 Africans are thrown overboard the slave ship Zong on the orders of a British slave-trader who then attempts to reclaim their value from insurers. The case becomes a landmark in the fight for abolition.

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