Harold Matthew Evans; Tina Brown ('The Editors')

1 portrait

Harold Matthew Evans; Tina Brown ('The Editors'), by David Buckland, 1987 - NPG P380 - © National Portrait Gallery, London

© National Portrait Gallery, London

Harold Matthew Evans; Tina Brown ('The Editors')

by David Buckland
cibachrome print, 1987
39 in. x 30 in. (991 mm x 762 mm)
Commissioned, 1988
Primary Collection
NPG P380


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Sittersback to top

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This portraitback to top

Hard, glossy and unreal, this photograph by David Buckland manages both to commemorate and to satirise the fictions of 1980s image-building. Harold Evans, as former editor at the Sunday Times, is associated with the promotion of colour supplement culture with its emphasis on lifestyle features and profiles, although he was also a great supporter of investigative journalism. His wife Tina Brown made her name as editor of Tatler before moving to New York, where she was editor first of Vanity Fair and now of The New Yorker.

Linked publicationsback to top

  • Rogers, Malcolm, Camera Portraits, 1989 (accompanying the exhibition at the National Portrait Gallery from 20 October 1989 - 21 January 1990), p. 313
  • Saumarez Smith, Charles, The National Portrait Gallery: An Illustrated Guide, 2000, p. 225
  • Saumarez Smith, Charles, The National Portrait Gallery, 1997, p. 225
  • Saywell, David; Simon, Jacob, Complete Illustrated Catalogue, 2004, p. 82

Events of 1987back to top

Current affairs

Hurricane-force winds batter southern England, blowing-down trees, and damaging buildings, blocking roads and causing 19 deaths. The storm was not predicted by the Met Office, a fact that is often jeeringly referred to by quoting Michael Fish's response to a report that 'there was a hurricane on the way…don't worry… there isn't' (the report was actually referring to Florida, not the UK).

Art and science

Alan Bennett's series of monologues Talking Heads is aired by the BBC. The series featured a set of characters that show the secret lives of the English: their dreams, frustrations, and fantasies. The impressive cast included Dame Thora Hird, Patricia Routledge, Maggie Smith, Julie Walters and Bennett himself.

International

The second largest ever one-day percentage decline in the stock market is named Black Monday. The Dow Jones index in the USA dropped dramatically followed by similar drops around the world. It is still unclear what exactly caused the crash, although worldwide panic selling certainly made it escalate. Terry Waite is taken hostage while trying to negotiate the release of four men held by the Islamic Jihad in Beirut.

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