The Homage-Giving: Westminster Abbey, 9th August, 1902

1 portrait of Arthur Foley Winnington-Ingram

The Homage-Giving: Westminster Abbey, 9th August, 1902, by John Henry Frederick Bacon, 1903 - NPG 6058 - © National Portrait Gallery, London

© National Portrait Gallery, London

The Homage-Giving: Westminster Abbey, 9th August, 1902

by John Henry Frederick Bacon
oil on canvas, 1903
38 in. x 72 in. (965 mm x 1829 mm)
Bequeathed by Miss M.E.B. Samson through the Art Fund, in memory of her father, 1989
Primary Collection
NPG 6058


Click on the links below to find out more:

Artistback to top

Sittersback to top

This portraitback to top

This picture commemorates the part of the coronation ceremony during which the king, already crowned, receives the homage of the nobility and clergy. The focus to the portrait is one of the more touching moments in the proceedings. Kneeling before the king, the elderly Archbishop of Canterbury, Frederick Temple, had found difficulty in rising again. As The Times reported, 'the King himself takes him by the right hand to help to raise him. Slowly and painfully, as it seems, the Archbishop regains his feet, and then he leans forward and kisses the King on the cheek; but, as he turns to leave, the King takes him again by the hand and clasps it with a gesture of regard too spontaneous and cordial to escape the most casual observation'. Among the many identifiable figures, the Prince of Wales is shown in the foreground and Queen Alexandra is seated to the right.

Linked publicationsback to top

Placesback to top

Events of 1903back to top

Current affairs

Emmeline Pankhurst forms the militant organisation, the Women's Social and Political Union, campaigning for greater rights for women and to secure them the vote. Its members were known as 'suffragettes', and adopted the slogan of 'Deeds, not words'. Joseph Chamberlain resigns as Colonial Secretary to campaign for tariff reform and an end to free trade, a key economic issue which splits the Conservative party.

Art and science

Henry James publishes The Ambassadors. Autobiographical in tone, it movingly and humorously traces the conversion of the American Lewis Lambert Strether, sent to Paris to find his widowed fiancee Mrs Newsome's wayward son Chad, to European culture. Charles Rennie Mackintosh, the leading Scottish arts and crafts designer and architect, designs the Willow tea rooms in Glasgow for his patron, Miss Catherine Cranston.

International

The Bolsheviks (meaning 'the majority'), a faction of the exiled Marxist Russian Social Democratic Labour Party, are formed after splitting from the Mensheviks at the Second Party Congress in London. After gaining independence following the end of the Spanish-American war, Cuba is forced to accept a permanent US military presence at Guantánamo Bay.

Tell us moreback to top

Can you tell us more about this portrait? Spotted an error, information that is missing (a sitter’s life dates, occupation or family relationships, or a date of portrait for example) or do you know anything that we don't know? If you have information to share please complete the form below.

If you require information from us, please use our Archive enquiry service. If you wish to license this image, please use our Rights and Images service.

Please note that we cannot provide valuations.

We digitise over 8,000 portraits a year and we cannot guarantee being able to digitise images that are not already scheduled.

What can you tell us?close

There are occasions when we are unsure of the identity of a sitter or artist, their life dates, occupation or have not recorded their family relationships. Sometimes we have not recorded the date of a portrait. Do you have specialist knowledge or a particular interest about any aspect of the portrait or sitter or artist that you can share with us? We would welcome any information that adds to and enhances our information and understanding about a particular portrait, sitter or artist.

Citationclose

How do you know this? Please could you let us know your source of information.

* Permission to publish (Privacy information)
Privacy Informationclose

The National Portrait Gallery will NOT use your information to contact you or store for any other purpose than to investigate or display your contribution. By ticking permission to publish you are indicating your agreement for your contribution to be shown on this collection item page. Please note your email address will not be displayed on the page nor will it be used for any marketing material or promotion of any kind.

Please ensure your comments are relevant and appropriate. Your contributions must be polite and with no intention of causing trouble. All contributions are moderated.

Your nameclose

If you tick permission to publish your name will appear above your contribution on our website.

Your Emailclose

Contributions are moderated. We'll need your email address so that we can follow up on the information provided and contact you to let you know when your contribution has been published.