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Royal Academicians

6 of 8 portraits of Thomas Sandby

Royal Academicians, by Charles Bestland, after  Henry Singleton, published 1802 (1795) - NPG D10716 - © National Portrait Gallery, London

© National Portrait Gallery, London

Royal Academicians

by Charles Bestland, after Henry Singleton
stipple engraving, published 1802 (1795)
25 3/8 in. x 31 3/4 in. (645 mm x 805 mm) paper size
Purchased, 1868
Reference Collection
NPG D10716


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Artistsback to top

  • Charles Bestland (active 1783-1837), Painter. Artist associated with 25 portraits.
  • Henry Singleton (1766-1839), Painter. Artist associated with 13 portraits.

Sittersback to top

  • John Bacon the Elder (1740-1799), Sculptor. Sitter in 9 portraits, Artist associated with 5 portraits.
  • Thomas Banks (1735-1805), Sculptor. Sitter in 7 portraits, Artist associated with 4 portraits.
  • James Barry (1741-1806), Painter. Sitter in 8 portraits, Artist associated with 10 portraits.
  • Francesco Bartolozzi (1727-1815), Engraver. Sitter in 16 portraits, Artist associated with 164 portraits.
  • Sir William Beechey (1753-1839), Portrait painter. Sitter in 7 portraits, Artist associated with 250 portraits.
  • Sir Peter Francis Bourgeois (1756-1811), Landscape painter; founder of Dulwich Picture Gallery. Sitter in 9 portraits.
  • Edward Burch (1730-1814), Painter. Sitter in 5 portraits, Artist of 1 portrait.
  • Charles Catton the Elder (1728-1798), Painter. Sitter in 7 portraits, Artist associated with 1 portrait.
  • Sir William Chambers (1723-1796), Architect. Sitter in 16 portraits.
  • John Singleton Copley (1738-1815), Painter. Sitter in 5 portraits, Artist associated with 21 portraits.
  • Richard Cosway (1742-1821), Miniature painter. Sitter in 15 portraits, Artist associated with 96 portraits.
  • George Dance (1741-1825), Architect and portrait draughtsman. Sitter in 7 portraits, Artist associated with 322 portraits.
  • Philippe Jacques de Loutherbourg (1740-1812), Painter. Sitter in 3 portraits, Artist associated with 4 portraits.
  • Joseph Farington (1747-1821), Landscape painter and diarist. Sitter in 5 portraits.
  • Henry Fuseli (1741-1825), Painter. Sitter in 11 portraits, Artist associated with 3 portraits.
  • Edmund Garvey (1740-1813), Painter. Sitter in 4 portraits.
  • William Hamilton (1751-1801), History painter. Sitter in 5 portraits, Artist associated with 12 portraits.
  • William Hodges (1744-1797), Painter. Sitter in 6 portraits, Artist associated with 5 portraits.
  • John Hoppner (1758-1810), Painter. Sitter in 13 portraits, Artist associated with 213 portraits.
  • Ozias Humphry (1742-1810), Painter. Sitter in 7 portraits, Artist associated with 43 portraits.
  • Angelica Kauffmann (1741-1807), Painter. Sitter in 9 portraits, Artist associated with 21 portraits.
  • Sir Thomas Lawrence (1769-1830), Portrait painter, collector and President of the Royal Academy. Sitter in 25 portraits, Artist associated with 684 portraits.
  • Mary Lloyd (née Moser) (1744-1819), Artist; founding member of the Royal Academy. Sitter in 6 portraits.
  • Joseph Nollekens (1737-1823), Sculptor. Sitter in 14 portraits, Artist associated with 19 portraits.
  • James Northcote (1746-1831), Painter; pupil and biographer of Sir Joshua Reynolds. Sitter associated with 23 portraits, Artist associated with 103 portraits.
  • John Opie (1761-1807), Portrait and history painter. Sitter in 13 portraits, Artist associated with 148 portraits.
  • John Inigo Richards (1731-1810), Landscape and scene painter. Sitter in 7 portraits.
  • John Francis Rigaud (1742-1810), Painter. Sitter in 5 portraits, Artist associated with 8 portraits.
  • John Russell (1745-1806), Portrait painter and pastellist. Sitter associated with 6 portraits, Artist associated with 102 portraits.
  • Paul Sandby (1725-1809), Watercolour painter and engraver and a founder of the Royal Academy of Arts. Sitter in 14 portraits, Artist associated with 4 portraits.
  • Thomas Sandby (1721-1798), Draughtsman and architect; brother of Paul Sandby. Sitter in 8 portraits.
  • Robert Smirke (1753-1845), Painter and illustrator. Sitter in 8 portraits, Artist associated with 23 portraits.
  • Thomas Stothard (1755-1834), Painter and illustrator. Sitter in 14 portraits, Artist associated with 33 portraits.
  • William Tyler (active circa 1760-died 1801), Sculptor and architect. Sitter in 5 portraits.
  • Benjamin West (1738-1820), History painter and President of the Royal Academy. Sitter associated with 43 portraits, Artist associated with 39 portraits.
  • Richard Westall (1765-1836), History painter. Sitter in 6 portraits, Artist associated with 13 portraits.
  • Francis Wheatley (1747-1801), Painter. Sitter associated with 5 portraits, Artist associated with 8 portraits.
  • Joseph Wilton (1722-1803), Sculptor. Sitter in 9 portraits, Artist associated with 7 portraits.
  • James Wyatt (1746-1813), Architect. Sitter in 7 portraits.
  • Johan Joseph Zoffany (1733-1810), Painter of portraits and conversation pieces. Sitter associated with 11 portraits, Artist associated with 46 portraits.

Related worksback to top

  • NPG D36021: Key to Royal Academicians (source portrait)

Placesback to top

Events of 1802back to top

Current affairs

After returning from Naples, Nelson tours England with the diplomat and antiquarian Sir William Hamilton and his wife Emma, with whom he was having an affair. With Nelson's status confirmed as a national hero, their reception outrivals that of the King. Extensive strikes in government shipyards led by John Gast.

Art and science

Francis Jeffrey, MP and arbiter of literary taste, co-founds the Edinburgh Review, the influential Whig quarterly which voiced strong criticism of Wordsworth, Coleridge and Southey. The Exchange, where stocks were traded, is rebuilt to cope with an increase in business during the Revolutionary and Napoleonic Wars.

International

Peace of Amiens; Britain finally agrees to unpopular peace, leaving France the chief power in Europe and returning recent British colonial acquisitions. Napoleon is declared First Consul of the French Empire for life. English flock to see the international war plunder now on display at the Louvre in Paris.

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