Horatio Walpole, 1st Earl of Orford

1 portrait of Horatio Walpole, 1st Earl of Orford

Horatio Walpole, 1st Earl of Orford, by Charles Turner, published by  Robert Cribb, after  Henry Walton, published 1 May 1806 - NPG D39371 - © National Portrait Gallery, London

© National Portrait Gallery, London

Horatio Walpole, 1st Earl of Orford

by Charles Turner, published by Robert Cribb, after Henry Walton
mezzotint, published 1 May 1806
14 in. x 10 in. (355 mm x 253 mm) plate size; 18 3/4 in. x 13 5/8 in. (476 mm x 346 mm) paper size
Purchased, 1935
Reference Collection
NPG D39371


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Sitterback to top

Artistsback to top

  • Robert Cribb (1755-1827), Framemaker, carver, gilder, printseller and publisher. Artist associated with 22 portraits.
  • Charles Turner (1773-1857), Engraver. Artist associated with 618 portraits, Sitter in 2 portraits.
  • Henry Walton (1746-1813). Artist associated with 17 portraits.

Related worksback to top

  • NPG D3774: Horatio Walpole, 1st Earl of Orford (from same plate)

Placesback to top

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Events of 1806back to top

Current affairs

William Pitt dies in January and his lifelong opponent Charles James Fox dies in September. Pitt is succeeded by William Wyndham, Baron Grenville, who forms the 'Ministry of all the Talents' coalition . Prince of Wales instigates the 'Delicate Investigation'; a Parliamentary enquiry into claims that his wife Caroline had an illegitimate child.

Art and science

John Constable embarks on a formative tour of the Lakes and makes landscape studies of the Langdale Pikes and Helvellyn. Turner exhibits his Thames views to acclaim at his own London gallery. Humphrey Davy discovers the elements potassium and sodium by passing an electrical current through molten compounds.

International

Soprano Angelica Catalani arrives from Italy to make her London debut, amazing audiences with her showpiece arias. Napoleon turns his forces east against Austria, Russia and Prussia and enjoys a wave of French victories. British attack on Buenos Aires under General William Beresford fails.

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