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Charles Mordaunt, 3rd Earl of Peterborough

17 of 21 portraits of Charles Mordaunt, 3rd Earl of Peterborough

Charles Mordaunt, 3rd Earl of Peterborough

by Jacobus Houbraken, after Sir Godfrey Kneller, Bt, published by John & Paul Knapton
line engraving, circa 1740
14 1/2 in. x 9 1/8 in. (369 mm x 233 mm) plate size; 16 3/8 in. x 11 in. (417 mm x 280 mm) paper size
acquired unknown source, 1929
Reference Collection
NPG D40169


Click on the links below to find out more:

Sitterback to top

Artistsback to top

  • Jacobus Houbraken (1698-1780), Engraver. Artist associated with 432 portraits.
  • John & Paul Knapton (active 1735-1789), Booksellers and publishers. Artist associated with 289 portraits.
  • Sir Godfrey Kneller, Bt (1646-1723), Portrait painter. Artist associated with 1682 portraits, Sitter associated with 30 portraits.

Related worksback to top

  • NPG D31408: Charles Mordaunt, 3rd Earl of Peterborough (from same plate)
  • NPG D40170: Charles Mordaunt, 3rd Earl of Peterborough (from same plate)

Events of 1740back to top

Current affairs

The song Rule, Britannia! by Thomas Arne is performed for the first time at Cliveden, the country home of Frederick, Prince of Wales. A now discredited account by antiquarian William Stukely asserts that Stonehenge was built by druids.

Art and science

Samuel Richardson publishes the first two volumes of Pamela, or Virtue Rewarded, the best-selling novel of the period. Artists Joshua Reynolds and Thomas Gainsborough both arrive in London. Reynolds is apprenticed to the leading portrait-painter Thomas Hudson, while Gainsborough begins his artistic training with the French engraver and illustrator Hubert-Francois Gravelot.

International

Death of the Holy Roman Emperor Charles VI and the succession of his eldest daughter Maria Térèsa heralds the start of the War of the Austrian Succession. Britain, already fighting Spain (in the War of Jenkin's Ear), is drawn into the wider conflict as an ally of Austria until 1748. Frederick II becomes King of Prussia. Pope Benedict XIV succeeds Pope Clement XII as the 247th pope.

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