Edward Seymour, 1st Duke of Somerset

1 portrait of Edward Seymour, 1st Duke of Somerset

Edward Seymour, 1st Duke of Somerset

by Jacobus Houbraken, published by John & Paul Knapton, after Hans Holbein the Younger
line engraving, published 1738
14 3/4 in. x 9 3/8 in. (374 mm x 237 mm) plate size; 20 5/8 in. x 13 5/8 in. (525 mm x 347 mm) paper size
Purchased with help from the Friends of the National Libraries and the Pilgrim Trust, 1966
Reference Collection
NPG D41815

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Sitterback to top

Artistsback to top

  • Hans Holbein the Younger (1497 or 1498-1543). Artist associated with 314 portraits, Sitter associated with 25 portraits.
  • Jacobus Houbraken (1698-1780), Engraver. Artist associated with 433 portraits.
  • John & Paul Knapton (active 1735-1789), Booksellers and publishers. Artist associated with 290 portraits.

Related worksback to top

  • NPG D20480: Edward Seymour, 1st Duke of Somerset (from same plate)
  • NPG D24807: Edward Seymour, 1st Duke of Somerset (from same plate)
  • NPG D41816: Edward Seymour, 1st Duke of Somerset (from same plate)
  • NPG D42884: Edward Seymour, 1st Duke of Somerset (from same plate)

Events of 1738back to top

Current affairs

Fetter Lane Society founded in London by the Moravians; a reformed group of Protestants led by exiled Saxon Count Nicolaus von Zinzendorf. He visits Britain to petition the king for protection for Moravian missionaries working in the British colonies. An act to this effect is finally passed in 1749. John Wesley is converted, essentially launching the Methodist movement.

Art and science

Artist Allan Ramsay returns to London from Rome and sets himself up as a portrait painter. Metallurgist William Champion patents a process to distil zinc from calamine using charcoal in a smelter.


Methodist preacher George Whitefield arrives in Savannah, Georgia to replace John Wesley; the first of seven visits across the Atlantic which make him one of the most widely recognised figures in the American colonies. Merchant sailor Robert Jenkins presents his pickled ear (cut off by Spanish coast-guards in Cuba in 1731) to Parliament stirring up war fever against Spain and leading to the War of Jenkins' Ear the following year.

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