Kitty Fisher

1 portrait

Kitty Fisher, by Edward Fisher, published by  Thomas Ewart, published by  Robert Sayer, after  Sir Joshua Reynolds, published 17 July 1759 - NPG D1951 - © National Portrait Gallery, London

© National Portrait Gallery, London

Kitty Fisher

by Edward Fisher, published by Thomas Ewart, published by Robert Sayer, after Sir Joshua Reynolds
mezzotint, published 17 July 1759
12 7/8 in. x 8 7/8 in. (328 mm x 226 mm) plate size; 14 1/8 in. x 11 1/4 in. (360 mm x 285 mm) paper size
Given by the daughter of compiler William Fleming MD, Mary Elizabeth Stopford (née Fleming), 1931
Reference Collection
NPG D1951


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Sitterback to top

Artistsback to top

  • Thomas Ewart (active 1745-circa 1781), Printer and publisher. Artist associated with 2 portraits.
  • Edward Fisher (1722-before 1782), Mezzotint engraver. Artist associated with 91 portraits.
  • Sir Joshua Reynolds (1723-1792), Painter and first President of the Royal Academy. Artist associated with 1413 portraits, Sitter associated with 38 portraits.
  • Robert Sayer (1724 or 1725-1794), Printseller and publisher. Artist associated with 196 portraits.

Placesback to top

Events of 1759back to top

Current affairs

British Museum opens to the public at Montagu House, based on the collections of the physician and scientist Sir Hans Sloane. Royal Botanic Gardens, Kew are created. David Garrick writes Heart of Oak, the official march of the Royal Navy, to celebrate a year of British victories.

Art and science

First volume of Laurence Sterne's Tristram Shandy is published. Artist Thomas Gainsborough moves to Bath. A Journey Through Europe; or, A Play of Geography, the earliest British board game, is produced and sold. Clockmaker John Harrison produces his 'No. 1 sea watch', the first successful marine chronometer.

International

Seven Years' War: British commander General James Wolfe is victorious at the Battle of Quebec and takes Quebec city, but dies in the engagement. At the Battle of Quiberon Bay, off the coast of Brittany, the British fleet are victorious over the French. Portuguese expel the Jesuits from Brazil, beginning a widespread reaction against the order in Catholic Europe.

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