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Anne Newport (née Pierrepont or Pierpont), Lady Torrington

3 of 4 portraits of Anne Newport (née Pierrepont or Pierpont), Lady Torrington

Anne Newport (née Pierrepont or Pierpont), Lady Torrington, by John Smith, after  Sir Godfrey Kneller, Bt, 1720 (1709) - NPG D4377 - © National Portrait Gallery, London

© National Portrait Gallery, London

Anne Newport (née Pierrepont or Pierpont), Lady Torrington

by John Smith, after Sir Godfrey Kneller, Bt
mezzotint, 1720 (1709)
13 7/8 in. x 9 7/8 in. (353 mm x 250 mm) plate size
Reference Collection
NPG D4377


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Sitterback to top

Artistsback to top

  • Sir Godfrey Kneller, Bt (1646-1723), Portrait painter. Artist associated with 1681 portraits, Sitter associated with 30 portraits.
  • John Smith (1652-1743), Engraver. Artist associated with 1180 portraits, Sitter in 4 portraits.

Related worksback to top

  • NPG D4376: Anne Newport (née Pierrepont or Pierpont), Lady Torrington (from same plate)
  • NPG D11609: Anne Newport (née Pierrepont or Pierpont), Lady Torrington (from same plate)

Subject/Themeback to top

Events of 1720back to top

Current affairs

Collapse of the South Sea Company's shares causes financial crisis in London and ruins many investors. Their rapid inflation and the speculation mania it had encouraged become known as the South Sea Bubble. Charles Townshend, 2nd Viscount Townshend returns to the Whig ministry. Robert Walpole 1st Earl of Orford, who had resigned in 1717, also returns and restores public credit in December.

Art and science

Entrepreneur Ralph Allen is appointed to take over the Cross and Bye Posts, which manage mail not going via London, leading to his eventual reform of the entire British postal system. History painter James Thornhill is appointed Serjeant Painter to the King and becomes the first British artist to receive a knighthood.

International

Treaty of the Hague signed between Britain, France, Austria, the Dutch Republic and Spain ending the War of the Quadruple Alliance. In Lhasa, the Dalai Lama accepts Chinese imperial protection, which lasts until 1911. Two political parties emerge in Sweden's parliament and become known as the Hats and the Caps.

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