Sir James Emerson Tennent, 1st Bt

1 portrait of Sir James Emerson Tennent, 1st Bt

Sir James Emerson Tennent, 1st Bt, by Richard Austin Artlett, after  George Richmond, published 1836 - NPG D5115 - © National Portrait Gallery, London

© National Portrait Gallery, London

Sir James Emerson Tennent, 1st Bt

by Richard Austin Artlett, after George Richmond
stipple engraving, published 1836
Reference Collection
NPG D5115


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Sitterback to top

Artistsback to top

  • Richard Austin Artlett (1807-1873), Engraver. Artist associated with 10 portraits.
  • George Richmond (1809-1896), Portrait painter and draughtsman; son of Thomas Richmond. Artist associated with 325 portraits, Sitter in 14 portraits.

Related worksback to top

  • NPG D40519: Sir James Emerson Tennent, 1st Bt (from same plate)

Events of 1836back to top

Current affairs

William Lovett founds the Working Men's Association, the precursor to Chartism, with the aim to achieving equal social and political rights between men of all classes. A reduction in stamp duty from 4d to 1d helps to keep unstamped newspapers off the street, and leads to wider circulation of legal newspapers. The first railway line is built in London, connecting to Greenwich and operated by the London Greenwich Railway (LGR).

Art and science

The American poet and writer Ralph Waldo Emerson outlines his theory of transcendentalism in Nature, in which he argues for individualism above traditional authority, stressing the infinitude of the private self and the possibility of achieving an original relation to the universe. The German philosopher Arthur Schopenhauer publishes On the Will in Nature, a precursor to his famous The World as Will and Representation.

International

Texas declares its independence from Mexico following a series of battles, including those at the Alamo and Goliad. Sam Houston is the first president of Texas, serving both in 1836-38 and 1841-44. The city of Adelaide is founded in Australia, at the mouth of the Torrens river, named in honour of Queen Adelaide, consort of William IV.

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