George Monck, 1st Duke of Albemarle, after Samuel Cooper, based on a work of circa 1660 - NPG 154 - © National Portrait Gallery, London

© National Portrait Gallery, London

George Monck, 1st Duke of Albemarle

after Samuel Cooper
oil on canvas, based on a work of circa 1660
30 1/8 in. x 25 in. (765 mm x 635 mm)
Purchased, 1863
NPG 154

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Laurie Pettitt

17 August 2017, 13:16

Oliver Cromwell's secret weapon: In Edinburgh, in 1650, George Monck was ordered by Cromwell to "Restore order, get people back into the churches and get people trading".
Something that our modern army neglected in the second Iraq war. Beside a successful time as General at Sea, George had a complete power in Scotland based on Cromwell's complete trust. People tell us that Scotland was ruled by a committee of eight in the English Parliament. Shocking! Except for the fact that both James and Charles had also used a committee of eight. People say that the Civil System had broken down, but Baron and Sheriff court records show business as usual. They say that the Ministers of the Church were persecuted, but many had abandoned their flocks and Cromwell had to recruit Ministers from England.
George did exactly what Cromwell ordered, he 'restored order'. He made it that the Insurgents with the King's warrant did not destroy the infrastructure. He made it that the Moss Troopers would be run to ground and their activities, similar to paramilitary groups in Ireland, curtailed. Licensed robbers. So let's not get too involved in the Scottish stories and half truths and look at how Monck, in full obedience to Cromwell's order, saved Britain from years of Civil War and strife.
When Cromwell died, the vultures were circling the weak Protectorate. Armies were being raised in France and even Spain. Generals who had once been faithful to Oliver Cromwell were thinking that they could impose their rule on the British people.
And George Monck knew that he had to fulfil the order. George Monck purged his ranks of the extremists and set out to restore order in England. He did not leave Coldstream to Restore the King. He left Coldstream to restore Order to England.
The Restoration of the King was a by product of the Restoration of Order.
So.... If any Royyals get to read this, I would like to submit that the march from Coldstream to London, not only restored the King, but it also saved Britain from the danger of another set of Civil Wars. The Coldstream Guards should have Honours for that march and the Honours should give them the status as the oldest and most Respected Regiment in the British Army. And those of you who wonder why Oliver Cromwell had left a known Royalist, with Royalist connections, in an insurmountable position in Scotland.... Will have to ask why the Modern Royals have so much to thank Cromwell for?

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