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 of the Century
A 
Sainsbury's Photographic Exhibition
Phtography
1900
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Photograph

Photograph

Photograph

Photograph

Photograph

Photograph


Autochrome, first colour process

The work of (Mary) Olive Edis (1876-1955) is well-represented in the NPG by a large collection of sepia platinotype portraits of celebrated subjects that she photographed in a career that began in 1903 and continued up until the late 1920s. In 1919, under the auspicies of the Imperial War Museum, she travelled to France and Belgium to photograph the contribution made to the war effort by women. In her self-portrait her cap-badge spells NWM standing for the Museums's previous name National War Museum.

The autochrome process was the first photographic method of producing natural colour photographs and was invented by the brothers Lumiere in 1907. Edis took up the process in the early 1910s and was to take interesting early colour photographs of subjects such as the novelist Thomas Hardy (1913) and the playwright George Bernard Shaw. However much of her most attractive colour work consists of portraits of her immediate family.


Self Portraits
Olive Edis
Sepia Platinotype photograph


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