Shakespeare quiz


NPG 1 - © National Portrait Gallery, London'All the world's a stage,
And all the men and women merely players'

But who says what on the stage? Click on the image of the person you think speaks those words in a Shakespeare play. The answer to that question will appear instantly; your final score will appear after you have answered all five questions (the last one is about a poem, not a play).


Question 1

Being king of England brings both these men a lot of trouble.

'Uneasy lies the head that wears a crown.'

Which one of them says this?


A. Richard II

B. Henry IV

Question 2

These two kings have very different approaches to fighting.

'Cry "God for Harry, England, and St George!" '

Which one makes this famous battle speech?

A. Henry V
B. Henry VI

Question 3

These two men have very different views about peace.

'I, in this weak piping time of peace,
Have no delight to pass away the time'

Which one finds peace doesn't suit him?


A. Richard III
B. Henry VII

Question 4

'I would not be a queen
For all the world.'

Which of these two lived to regret changing her mind about this?

A. Catherine of Aragon
B. Ann Boleyn

Question 5

Dedicating his long poem Venus and Adonis, Shakespeare calls it 'unpolished lines' and apologises for 'choosing so strong a prop to support so weak a burden.'

To which of these two did he dedicate it?

A. Henry Wriothesley, 3rd Earl of Southampton

B. Elizabeth I

Follow up notes
The quotations come from the following places:

William Shakespeare, Jaques' speech, in As You Like It, Act II, Scene 7

Richard II, in Richard II, Act III, Scene 2
Henry IV, in Henry IV Part 2, Act III, Scene 1

Henry V, in Henry V, Act III, Scene 1
Henry VI, in Henry VI Part 3, Act II, Scene 5

Richard III, Gloucester's speech, in Richard III, Act I, Scene 1
Henry VII, Richmond's speech, in Richard III, Act V, Scene 4

Catherine of Aragon in Henry VIII, Act II, Scene 4
Anne Boleyn in Henry VIII, Act II, Scene 3

Dedication to the Earl of Southampton, in Venus and Adonis
Elizabeth I, described in Oberon's speech, A Midsummer Night's Dream, Act II, Scene1