Self image: making a self-portrait (3)

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How many self-portraits will you make during your lifetime?
These two artists made several.
Dorothy Wilding 1893-1976

Dorothy Wilding, by Dorothy Wilding, mid 1920s - NPG  - © William Hustler and Georgina Hustler / National Portrait Gallery, London

Dorothy Wilding
by Dorothy Wilding
mid 1920s
NPG P870(13)


Dorothy Wilding, by Dorothy Wilding, 1920s - NPG  - © William Hustler and Georgina Hustler / National Portrait Gallery, London

Dorothy Wilding
by Dorothy Wilding
1920s
NPG x27401

 
Dorothy Wilding, by Dorothy Wilding, 1930s - NPG  - © William Hustler and Georgina Hustler / National Portrait Gallery, London

Dorothy Wilding
by Dorothy Wilding
1930s
NPG x27403


Dorothy Wilding, by Dorothy Wilding, 1940s - NPG  - © William Hustler and Georgina Hustler / National Portrait Gallery, London

Dorothy Wilding
by Dorothy Wilding
1940s
NPG x27404


Dorothy Wilding, by Dorothy Wilding, 1930s-1940s - NPG  - © William Hustler and Georgina Hustler / National Portrait Gallery, London

Dorothy Wilding
by Dorothy Wilding
1930s-1940s
NPG x27405


Dorothy Wilding, by Dorothy Wilding, 1950s - NPG  - © William Hustler and Georgina Hustler / National Portrait Gallery, London

Dorothy Wilding
by Dorothy Wilding
1950s
NPG x27407


Jonathan Richardson 1667-1745
In his theory of painting, An Essay on the Theory of Painting (1715), Richardson states:

"In Picture we never die, never decay, or or grow older. Painting has another Advantage over Words, and that is, it Pours Ideas in our Minds, Words only Drop them, The whole Scene opens at one View, whereas the other way lifts up the curtain little by little."

"Painting is of great use, as being one of the means wheby we convey our Ideas to each other, and which in some respects has the Advantage of all the rest. And thus it must be rank'd with These, and accordingly esteem'd not only as an Enjoyment, but as another Language, which completes the whole art of communicating our thoughts; one of those particulars which raises the Dignity of Human Nature so much above the Brutes; and which is the more considerable, as being Gift bestowed but upon a Few even of our own Species."

Horace Walpole, 4th Earl of Oxford (1717-1797) records that Richardson made daily portraits of himself and his son after he retired.
Jonathan Richardson, by Jonathan Richardson, 1729 - NPG  - © National Portrait Gallery, London

Jonathan Richardson
by Jonathan Richardson
1729
NPG 706


Jonathan Richardson, by Jonathan Richardson, 1730 - NPG  - © National Portrait Gallery, London

Jonathan Richardson
by Jonathan Richardson
1730
NPG 1831


Jonathan Richardson, by Jonathan Richardson, October 1735 - NPG  - © National Portrait Gallery, London

Jonathan Richardson
by Jonathan Richardson
October 1735
NPG 3779


Jonathan Richardson, by Jonathan Richardson, 1736 - NPG  - © National Portrait Gallery, London

Jonathan Richardson
by Jonathan Richardson
1736
NPG 3023