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Gender Pay Gap Report

In 2017 the Government introduced new legislation that made it a statutory requirement for organisations with 250 or more employees to report annually on their gender pay gap. Government Departments and Relevant Public Sector employers are covered by the Equality Act 2010 (Specific Duties and Public Authorities) which came into force on 31 March 2017. Data must be calculated using a snap shot date each year. This will always be 31 March for Public Authorities subject to the Specific Duties Regulations, and 5 April for all other employers. Employers have up to 12 months from their snap shot data to publish their report, which must include:

  • Mean and Median Gender Pay Gaps
  • Mean and Median Gender BonusGaps
  • Proportion of Maleand Female employees receiving bonuses
  • Proportion of Male and Femaleemployeesin each quartile pay band

The Gender pay gap shows the difference in the average paybetween all men and women within the workforce.

The Meangender pay gap looks at the difference between the mean hourly rate for all male full pay relevant employees and all female full pay relevant employees

The Median gender pay gap looks at the difference between the median hourly rate of pay for all male full pay relevant employees and all female full pay relevant employees.

The data must include employees Ordinary Pay, Allowances and payments in respect of annual leave but does not include payments for Overtime.

Gender Pay reporting is not the same as reporting on Equal Pay. Equal Pay looks at the differences in the actual earnings of both men and women who undertake equal work.

Gender Pay Gap Report 2017 Gender Pay Gap Report 2018