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Nigel Balchin

(1908-1970), Novelist

Sitter in 8 portraits
Balchin joined the National Institute of Psychology in 1930 and became a consultant to J.S. Rowntree & Son. He developed a second career as a writer, becoming a regular contributor to Punch under the pseudonym Mark Spade, with How to Run a Bassoon Factory (1934) and Business for Pleasure (1935); these satires on efficiency in the workplace drew on his work at Rowntree. Balchin joined the War Office as a psychologist in 1941 and went on to become Deputy Scientific Adviser to the army council. He came to prominence as a novelist for his works Darkness Falls from the Skies (1942) and The Small Back Room (1943), both of which captured the atmosphere of London during the Blitz.

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Nigel Balchin, by Sir David Low - NPG 4529(7)

Nigel Balchin

by Sir David Low
pencil, 1952 or before
NPG 4529(7)

Nigel Balchin, by Sir David Low - NPG 4529(8)

Nigel Balchin

by Sir David Low
pencil, 1952 or before
NPG 4529(8)

Nigel Balchin, by Sir David Low - NPG 4529(9)

Nigel Balchin

by Sir David Low
pencil, 1952 or before
NPG 4529(9)

Nigel Balchin, by Sir David Low - NPG 4529(10)

Nigel Balchin

by Sir David Low
pencil, 1952 or before
NPG 4529(10)

Nigel Balchin, by Sir David Low - NPG 4529(11)

Nigel Balchin

by Sir David Low
pencil, 1952 or before
NPG 4529(11)

Nigel Balchin, by Sir David Low - NPG 4529(11a)

Nigel Balchin

by Sir David Low
pencil, 1952 or before
NPG 4529(11a)

Nigel Balchin, by Mark Gerson - NPG x162

Nigel Balchin

by Mark Gerson
bromide print, November 1952
NPG x162

Web image not currently available

Nigel Balchin

by Walter Bird
vintage print, circa 1950s
NPG x183925

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