The Gallery holds the most extensive collection of portraits in the world. Search over 215,000 works, 150,000 of which are illustrated from the 16th Century to the present day.

Search the Collection

Dion Boucicault

(1820-1890), Actor and playwright; father of Darley George Boucicault (Dion Boucicault Jr)

Dion Boucicault (Dionysius Lardner Boursiquot)

Sitter in 8 portraits
Dion Boucicault was an Irish-American playwright and actor, and was a major influence on the form and content of American drama. Educated in England, he began acting in 1837. His first play was rejected but his second, London Assurance (1841), was a huge success. In 1853 Boucicault moved to New York, where his plays and adaptations were extremely popular. He led a movement of playwrights that in 1856 produced the first copyright law for drama in the United States. His play The Octoroon; or, Life in Louisiana (1859) caused a sensation with its implied attack on slavery. Boucicault's concern with social themes prefigured the future development of drama in both Europe and America.

Tell us More

List Thumbnail

Dion Boucicault, by Harry Furniss - NPG 3554

Dion Boucicault

by Harry Furniss
pen and ink, 1880s-1900s
NPG 3554

Dion Boucicault, by London Stereoscopic & Photographic Company - NPG x1176

Dion Boucicault

by London Stereoscopic & Photographic Company
albumen carte-de-visite, 1860s
NPG x1176

Dion Boucicault, by London Stereoscopic & Photographic Company - NPG Ax28532

Dion Boucicault

by London Stereoscopic & Photographic Company
albumen carte-de-visite, 1874 or before
NPG Ax28532

Dion Boucicault, by Frederick Sem - NPG D957

Dion Boucicault

by Frederick Sem
watercolour and pencil, 1869 or after
NPG D957

Dion Boucicault, by Frederick Sem - NPG D958

Dion Boucicault

by Frederick Sem
watercolour and pencil, 1869 or after
NPG D958

Dion Boucicault (Dionysius Lardner Boursiquot) ('London Assurance'), published by Frederick Arnold, after  Unknown artist - NPG D48305

Dion Boucicault (Dionysius Lardner Boursiquot) ('London Assurance')

published by Frederick Arnold, after Unknown artist
lithograph, published in the Hornet 11 September 1872
NPG D48305

Dion Boucicault (in 'The Shaughraun'), by Alfred Bryan, for  Maclure & Macdonald - NPG D17097

Dion Boucicault (in 'The Shaughraun')

by Alfred Bryan, for Maclure & Macdonald
chromolithograph, circa 1875
NPG D17097

Dion Boucicault ('Men of the Day. No. 268.'), by Sir Leslie Ward - NPG D44099

Dion Boucicault ('Men of the Day. No. 268.')

by Sir Leslie Ward
chromolithograph, published in Vanity Fair 16 December 1882
NPG D44099

Tell us more back to top

Can you tell us more about this person? Spotted an error, information that is missing (a sitter’s life dates, occupation or family relationships, or a date of portrait for example) or do you know anything that we don't know? If you have information to share please complete the form below.

If you require information from us, please use our Archive enquiry service. You can buy a print of most illustrated portraits. Select the portrait of interest to you, then look out for a Buy a Print button. Prices start at £6 for unframed prints, £25 for framed prints. If you wish to license an image, please use our Rights and Images service.

Please note that we cannot provide valuations.

We digitise over 8,000 portraits a year and we cannot guarantee being able to digitise images that are not already scheduled.

Robert Whelan

09 June 2019, 12:25

This cartoon was published shortly after the premiere of Dion Boucicault's spectacular musical extravaganza Babil and Bijou at Covent Garden on 29 August 1872. It was bankrolled by the Earl of Londesborough and was said to be the most expensive show ever seen in London. The sub-title of the cartoon is therefore sarcastic: far from restoring the national drama, Boucicault was accused of debasing it by feeding the public appetite for spectacle over literary texts. The scene references the famous water-cave scene from Boucicault's melodrama The Colleen Bawn (1860) in which Boucicault, as the loveable rogue Myles-na-Coppaleen, takes a header into the lake to save the drowning Eily O' Connor (the Colleen Bawn). This 'sensation scene' gave rise to the term 'sensation drama' to describe a play that owed its success to a spectacular stunt. London Assurance was the title of the comedy which Boucicault wrote for Madame Vestris and Charles Mathews to perform at Covent Garden in 1841 when he was only twenty.

What can you tell us?close

There are occasions when we are unsure of the identity of a sitter or artist, their life dates, occupation or have not recorded their family relationships. Sometimes we have not recorded the date of a portrait. Do you have specialist knowledge or a particular interest about any aspect of the portrait or sitter or artist that you can share with us? We would welcome any information that adds to and enhances our information and understanding about a particular portrait, sitter or artist.

Citationclose

How do you know this? Please could you let us know your source of information.

* Permission to publish (Privacy information)
Privacy Informationclose

The National Portrait Gallery will NOT use your information to contact you or store for any other purpose than to investigate or display your contribution. By ticking permission to publish you are indicating your agreement for your contribution to be shown on this collection item page. Please note your email address will not be displayed on the page nor will it be used for any marketing material or promotion of any kind.

Please ensure your comments are relevant and appropriate. Your contributions must be polite and with no intention of causing trouble. All contributions are moderated.

Your Emailclose

Contributions are moderated. We'll need your email address so that we can follow up on the information provided and contact you to let you know when your contribution has been published.