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Charles Tennant

(1768-1838), Manufacturing chemist

Regency Portraits Catalogue Entry

Sitter in 5 portraits
Tenant was initially apprenticed to a handloom weaver in Kilbarchan in Scotland. The bleaching of cloth was an important aspect of the weaving industry; after studying bleaching methods Tennant took out a patent in 1799 to manufacture bleaching powder by passing chlorine over slaked lime. He subsequently moved to St Rollox, near Glasgow, where with his partners he established a factory to produce the powder commercially. Soda ash and other alkali products were also made, and St Rollox eventually grew into one of Europe's largest chemical works.

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Men of Science Living in 1807-8, by Sir John Gilbert, and  Frederick John Skill, and  William Walker, and  Elizabeth Walker (née Reynolds) - NPG 1075

Men of Science Living in 1807-8

by Sir John Gilbert, and Frederick John Skill, and William Walker, and Elizabeth Walker (née Reynolds)
pencil and wash, 1858-1862
NPG 1075

Charles Tennant, by John George Murray, after  Andrew Geddes - NPG D40516

Charles Tennant

by John George Murray, after Andrew Geddes
mezzotint, (1830s)
NPG D40516

Charles Tennant, by John George Murray, after  Andrew Geddes - NPG D40517

Charles Tennant

by John George Murray, after Andrew Geddes
mezzotint, (1830s)
NPG D40517

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