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George Zobel

(1810-1881), Printmaker

Artist associated with 51 portraits

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John Farnell, by George Zobel, after  Thomas Musgrove Joy - NPG D36656

John Farnell

by George Zobel, after Thomas Musgrove Joy
mezzotint, mid 19th century
NPG D36656

George Madan, by George Zobel, after  James Curnock - NPG D38139

George Madan

by George Zobel, after James Curnock
mezzotint, mid 19th century
NPG D38139

Edward Jervis Jervis, 2nd Viscount St Vincent, by George Zobel, published by  James Gundry, published by  Ackermann & Co, after  Sir Francis Grant - NPG D40018

Edward Jervis Jervis, 2nd Viscount St Vincent

by George Zobel, published by James Gundry, published by Ackermann & Co, after Sir Francis Grant
mezzotint, mid 19th century
NPG D40018

James William Gilbart, by George Zobel, after  Thomas Richard Williams - NPG D34470

James William Gilbart

by George Zobel, after Thomas Richard Williams
mezzotint, mid 19th century
NPG D34470

James Alexander Haldane, by George Zobel, after  Colvin Smith - NPG D35111

James Alexander Haldane

by George Zobel, after Colvin Smith
stipple and line engraving, circa 1845
NPG D35111

Thomas Grosvenor Egerton, 2nd Earl of Wilton, by George Zobel, after  Heinrich von Angeli - NPG D37045

Thomas Grosvenor Egerton, 2nd Earl of Wilton

by George Zobel, after Heinrich von Angeli
mezzotint, after 1845
NPG D37045

George William Frederick Villiers, 4th Earl of Clarendon, by George Zobel, after  Sir Francis Grant - NPG D33273

George William Frederick Villiers, 4th Earl of Clarendon

by George Zobel, after Sir Francis Grant
stipple engraving, published 1850
NPG D33273

Henry Purcell, by George Zobel, after  John Closterman - NPG D40770

Henry Purcell

by George Zobel, after John Closterman
mezzotint, circa 1850s-1870s
NPG D40770

Henry Purcell, by George Zobel, after  John Closterman - NPG D3979

Henry Purcell

by George Zobel, after John Closterman
mezzotint, circa 1850s-1870s
NPG D3979

Hon. Frances Anna Georgiana Kinnaird (née Ponsonby), by George Zobel, published by  Paul and Dominic Colnaghi & Co, after  Sir Francis Grant - NPG D36881

Hon. Frances Anna Georgiana Kinnaird (née Ponsonby)

by George Zobel, published by Paul and Dominic Colnaghi & Co, after Sir Francis Grant
mezzotint, published 1 November 1851
NPG D36881

Benjamin Hall, 1st Baron Llanover, by George Zobel, after  Frederick Yeates Hurlstone - NPG D3585

Benjamin Hall, 1st Baron Llanover

by George Zobel, after Frederick Yeates Hurlstone
mezzotint, 1851-1881
NPG D3585

Gilbert Elliot Murray Kynynmound, 2nd Earl of Minto, by George Zobel, after  Sir Francis Grant - NPG D5690

Gilbert Elliot Murray Kynynmound, 2nd Earl of Minto

by George Zobel, after Sir Francis Grant
mezzotint, published 1851
NPG D5690

Gilbert Elliot Murray Kynynmound, 2nd Earl of Minto, by George Zobel, published by  Paul and Dominic Colnaghi & Co, after  Sir Francis Grant - NPG D7735

Gilbert Elliot Murray Kynynmound, 2nd Earl of Minto

by George Zobel, published by Paul and Dominic Colnaghi & Co, after Sir Francis Grant
mezzotint, published 1 November 1851
NPG D7735

Thomas Wilde, 1st Baron Truro, by George Zobel, after  Sir Francis Grant - NPG D7798

Thomas Wilde, 1st Baron Truro

by George Zobel, after Sir Francis Grant
mezzotint, published 1851
NPG D7798

Benjamin Hall, 1st Baron Llanover, by George Zobel, after  Frederick Yeates Hurlstone - NPG D8916

Benjamin Hall, 1st Baron Llanover

by George Zobel, after Frederick Yeates Hurlstone
mezzotint, 1851-1881
NPG D8916

Harry Farr-Yeatman, by George Zobel, after  Sir Francis Grant - NPG D36249

Harry Farr-Yeatman

by George Zobel, after Sir Francis Grant
mezzotint, 1852
NPG D36249

James Howard Harris, 3rd Earl of Malmesbury, by George Zobel, after  James Godsell Middleton - NPG D38170

James Howard Harris, 3rd Earl of Malmesbury

by George Zobel, after James Godsell Middleton
mezzotint, (1852)
NPG D38170

Thomas Grimston Bucknall Estcourt, by George Zobel, printed by  Thomas Brooker, after  Henry William Pickersgill - NPG D36584

Thomas Grimston Bucknall Estcourt

by George Zobel, printed by Thomas Brooker, after Henry William Pickersgill
mixed-method engraving, 1853 or after
NPG D36584

Constance Grosvenor (née Sutherland-Leveson-Gower), Duchess of Westminster, by George Zobel, published by  Paul and Dominic Colnaghi & Co, after  Théodore Gudin - NPG D37829

Constance Grosvenor (née Sutherland-Leveson-Gower), Duchess of Westminster

by George Zobel, published by Paul and Dominic Colnaghi & Co, after Théodore Gudin
mixed-method engraving, published 31 March 1853
NPG D37829

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Rosalie Zobel

13 May 2018, 12:34

George Zobel is my great, great grandfather. He was the son of Benjamin Zobel, an immigrant from Memmingen, Bavaria, Germany, who was table decker to King George the 3rd. Benjamin discovered a way to fix onto paper his sand paintings, which he produced in the middle of the Royal banquet table. He kept the method secret, so sand painting died out. I heard from my grandfather that George was a respected artist who made quite a lot of money from engravings, which were the equivalent of high-end portrait photography today. George spent a lot of his earnings on parties and weekends with friends in Brighton. He was said to have been an excellent billiards player, and entered national competitions. When he won, he took all his friends by carriage to the seaside. He also lost a lot of money on a border dispute with his neighbour, so was never rich. He regularly visited his family in Germany by boat and train. On one trip he helped an old lady, Mrs Jenkins. She left him an inheritance, so he changed his name to George James Jenkins Zobel.

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