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(Elaine) Thérèse Lessore

(1884-1945), Painter; third wife of Walter Sickert

Sitter in 7 portraits
Therese Lessore was a French painter born in Brighton. Her first husband was Bernard William Adeney, a leading member of the Bloomsbury group. She became the third wife of the English Impressionist painter Walter Sickert in 1926.

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Walter Sickert; Thérèse Lessore, by Cecil Beaton - NPG P869(21)

Walter Sickert; Thérèse Lessore

by Cecil Beaton
vintage bromide print on white card mount, 15 September 1940
NPG P869(21)

Thérèse Lessore; Walter Sickert, by George Woodbine, for  Daily Herald - NPG x74797

Thérèse Lessore; Walter Sickert

by George Woodbine, for Daily Herald
modern bromide print from original negative, 5 March 1934
NPG x74797

Walter Sickert; Thérèse Lessore, by George Woodbine, for  Daily Herald - NPG x74798

Walter Sickert; Thérèse Lessore

by George Woodbine, for Daily Herald
modern bromide print from original negative, 5 March 1934
NPG x74798

Walter Sickert; Thérèse Lessore, by George Woodbine, for  Daily Herald - NPG x74799

Walter Sickert; Thérèse Lessore

by George Woodbine, for Daily Herald
modern bromide print from original negative, 5 March 1934
NPG x74799

Thérèse Lessore; Walter Sickert, by George Woodbine, for  Daily Herald - NPG x74800

Thérèse Lessore; Walter Sickert

by George Woodbine, for Daily Herald
modern bromide print from original negative, 5 March 1934
NPG x74800

Walter Sickert; Thérèse Lessore, by George Woodbine, for  Daily Herald - NPG x70976

Walter Sickert; Thérèse Lessore

by George Woodbine, for Daily Herald
modern bromide print from original negative, 5 March 1934
NPG x70976

Thérèse Lessore, by Cicely Mary Hey - NPG D34003

Thérèse Lessore

by Cicely Mary Hey
pen and ink, charcoal and watercolour, 1933 or before
NPG D34003

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Jacqueline Sarsby

14 November 2018, 17:33

Her first husband was Bernard Adeney (sic) who taught design and became President of the London Group of Artists of which she was a founder member. Her elder sister was Louise (Ada Louise), calligrapher, embroiderer and designer and hand-painter of ceramics, who married Alfred Powell. Therese also painted on Wedgwood blanks like her sister and brother-in-law. She was an accomplished etcher, and Phyllis Barron, in her autobiography (spoken at Dartington Conferences) describes how Therese suggested she try using nitric acid in order to discharge indigo, which was an important step for her in starting to dye textiles. Her grandfather was Emile Lessore, who worked at Sevres and afterwards became Art Director at Wedgwood in the 1860s.

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