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Doris Lloyd

(1896-1968), Actress

Sitter in 2 portraits

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Doris Lloyd, by Bassano Ltd - NPG x85142

Doris Lloyd

by Bassano Ltd
bromide print, 1921
NPG x85142

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Kevin McMahon

19 August 2018, 17:39

Doris Lloyd was born Hessy Doris Lloyd on 3 July 1896 in Walton Liverpool, Walton became part of Liverpool Borough Council in 1895
She first appeared on stage with the Liverpool Repertory Theatre Company in 1914 at their home now called the Liverpool Playhouse. The Liverpool Theatre Company was established in 1911 and purchased the Star Theatre for £28,000 it was renamed in 1916 as the Liverpool Playhouse.
In 1915 Intending to merely visit her sister in the United States she herself settled in California.
She lived in a hacienda-style house at 935 Chautanqua Boulevard Pacific Palisades with her sister Milba, a sculptor. Doris was described as ‘gentle sweet and generous and never a gossip’ she held regular soirees for close friends.
Between 1916 and 1925 she made many appearances in Broadway theatre including a number of Ziegfeld Follies, 1921, 1922,1924 and 1925. she spent time on the road with a number of touring companies.
She stated her movie career in 1925, one of her first roles was in The Man from Red Gulch 1925
She appeared in over 150 films between 1925 and 1967. She devoted her times to film with the exception of, returning to Broadway in 1947 for a production of An Inspector Calls playing the part of Sybil Birling.
She played many character roles from a sinister Russian spy, in Disraeli 1929 to a meek housekeeper in the 1960 film The Time machine.
She had a wide playing age but by the late 1930’s she had settled into middle-aged character roles.
She was in two Oscar Best Picture winners Mutiny on the Bounty 1935 and The Sound of music 1965 as well as four nominees, Disraeli 1929, A Farewell to Arms 1932, The Letter 1940 and Mary Poppins 1964.
From her long list of film credits, Tarzan the Ape man 1932, Study in Scarlet 1933, Wolf Man 1941, Dr Jekyll and Mr Hyde 1941, Frankenstein meets the Wolfman 1943, Alice in Wonderland 1951 and many, many more.
She died of a heart ailment on 21 May 1968 (aged 71 years) in Santa Barbara California and is buried at the Forest Lawn Memorial Park Glendale. Her inscription reads Beloved Daughter and Sister.

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