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Early Georgian Portraits Catalogue

Philip Yorke, 1st Earl of Hardwicke (1690-1764), Lord Chancellor

A small whole length as a baron in the robes of lord chief justice, datable to 1733-37, was presented to the Middle Temple in 1825 as by 'Arnold Van Straechen'. The portrait was at one time attributed to Vanhaecken, perhaps A. Vanhaecken known only as a drapery painter. [1] All subsequent portraits, as in NPG 872, show the sitter as chancellor. Faber junior engraved a head ad vivum in 1737. A portrait by James Wills, in the Middle Temple, is inscribed 1740 and was engraved by McArdell, 1744. A whole length by Ramsay, inherited through the marriage of the 2nd Earl of Hardwicke to Jemima Campbell, afterwards Baroness Lucas, was formerly in the Lucas collection at Wrest Park; smaller versions are at Hagley and Lincoln's Inn. An engraving by Baron is lettered 1742. A whole length by Hudson in the Bute collection is inscribed 1757. The type, engraved three-quarter length, in reverse, by Faber junior and dedicated to Herring when Archbishop of Canterbury, 1747-57, is possibly from a second sitting. The silhouette dated 1758, collection H. W. Wollaston (see Thomas Gray) was probably taken in Cambridge that year. The last portrait is presumably the Hoare of 1763, discussed under NPG 466.
Hardwicke, as Sir Philip Yorke, solicitor general, is possibly represented in the group 'Court of Chancery' by Benjamin Ferrers (see NPG 798). He may also be the sitter 'Philip Yorke, 1. E. of Hardwicke, Ld Chancr by Ramsay ... also by Reynolds' recorded by Musgrave at Wimpole, 1798. [2] No such portrait by Reynolds is now known.

1) See 1st Earl of Bath, NPG 337.
2) British Museum Add. MS 6391, f.19.


This extended catalogue entry is from the out-of-print National Portrait Gallery collection catalogue: John Kerslake, Early Georgian Portraits, Her Majesty's Stationery Office, 1977, and is as published then. For the most up-to-date details on individual Collection works, we recommend reading the information provided in the Search the Collection results on this website in parallel with this text.