The Gallery holds the most extensive collection of portraits in the world. Search over 215,000 works, 150,000 of which are illustrated from the 16th Century to the present day.

Advanced Collection search

Later Stuart Portraits Catalogue

Sir Isaac Newton (1642-1727), Mathematical scientist

Valuable commentaries on Newton’s iconography have been made by P. Fara, Newton, the Making of a Genius, 2002 and T. Hunt in Great Britons, NPG, 2002, pp 68-81. An inclusive iconography has been compiled by Keynes, to which the compiler is much indebted; the following list is less inclusive.

1689
Painting by Godfrey Kneller, half-length, right hand on left arm. Earl of Portsmouth (J. D. Stewart, Godfrey Kneller, 1983, no.528; M. Keynes, The Iconography of Sir Isaac Newton to 1800, 2005, II-1, p 12). Exhibited Sir Godfrey Kneller, NPG, 1971, no.80a. A studio copy at The Vyne (M. Keynes, The Iconography of Sir Isaac Newton to 1800, 2005, II-2, p 13), and a copy from the collection of Viscount Galway sold Christie’s, Lyegrove, 26 September 1988, lot 332 (M. Keynes, The Iconography of Sir Isaac Newton to 1800, 2005, II-4, p 14); a three-quarter-length variant with a globe and open book behind him in the Royal Collection (O. Millar, The Tudor, Stuart and Early Georgian Pictures in the Collection of Her Majesty The Queen, 1963, no.363; P. Fara, Newton, the Making of a Genius, 2002, pp 30-31; M. Keynes, The Iconography of Sir Isaac Newton to 1800, 2005, II-3, pp 13-14), a copy of which by Hermann Goldschmidt 1847 is in the musée de Versailles (2085; Les Peintures, 1995, I, p 405).

1702-10
Ivory plaque by David Le Marchand inscribed ad viv[um]. Lord Thomson of Fleet (C. Avery, David le Marchand 1674-1726, 1996, no.44; M. Keynes, The Iconography of Sir Isaac Newton to 1800, 2005, B.1, p 74). A wax version at Corsham (C. Avery, David le Marchand 1674-1726, 1996, no.45; M. Keynes, The Iconography of Sir Isaac Newton to 1800, 2005, B.2, p 74) and a bronze was listed in an English private collection in 1997 (M. Keynes, The Iconography of Sir Isaac Newton to 1800, 2005, A.6, p 77).

Ivory medallion by David Le Marchand. Untraced; Christie’s, 5 April 1864, lot 2035 (C. Avery, David le Marchand 1674-1726, 1996, no.46; M. Keynes, The Iconography of Sir Isaac Newton to 1800, 2005, B.3, p 74).

1702
Painting by Godfrey Kneller, see NPG 2881.

1710
Painting by James Thornhill, three-quarter-length seated, left hand at breast, right on a table. Trinity College, Cambridge, given by Richard Bentley (P. Fara, Newton, the Making of a Genius, 2002, pp 35-36; M. Keynes, The Iconography of Sir Isaac Newton to 1800, 2005, IV-1, pp 18-19; illus. Connoisseur, CXL, 1957, p 235). Bust-length copy in the Athenaeum (H. Tait & R. Walker, The Athenaeum Collection, 2000, p 77, no.629).

c.1712
Painting by James Thornhill, three-quarter-length seated, left hand at breast, his right making an oratorical gesture, a fluted column to right. Earl of Portsmouth (P. Fara, Newton, the Making of a Genius, 2002, p 36; M. Keynes, The Iconography of Sir Isaac Newton to 1800, 2005, IV-2, pp 19-20). A replica at Woolsthorpe Manor (M. Keynes, The Iconography of Sir Isaac Newton to 1800, 2005, IV-3, p 20), and a bust-length copy in the library of the Wellcome Institute (M. Keynes, The Iconography of Sir Isaac Newton to 1800, IV-4, p 20). Engraved, reversed, J. Simon 1712 (J. Chaloner Smith, British Mezzotinto Portraits, 110; M. Keynes, The Iconography of Sir Isaac Newton to 1800, 2005, XLV-1, p 57). A bust-length pencil copy by John Downman is in the Fitzwilliam Museum (1952; M. Keynes, The Iconography of Sir Isaac Newton to 1800, IV-6, p 21). See also under Valentine Ritz c.1735 below.

1714
Ivory bust by David Le Marchand. National Gallery of Victoria, Melbourne (C. Avery, David le Marchand 1674-1726, 1996, no.47; M. Keynes, The Iconography of Sir Isaac Newton to 1800, A.1, p 72). ‘a small bust in Ivory done from the life Sr. Isaac Newton a head without a wigg - 1714 by Marchand’ was in the Halifax sale, 6-10 March 1740 (G. Vertue, Notebooks, Wal. Soc., XXIV, 1936, p 166; unidentifiable in sale catalogue).

1717
Painting by Charles Jervas, three-quarter-length seated to left, pointing to a gold watch with his right hand. Royal Society, London, commissioned by the sitter and presented 1717 (N. H. Robinson, The Royal Society Catalogue of Portraits, 1980, p 228, illus.; M. Keynes, The Iconography of Sir Isaac Newton to 1800, 2005, VI-1, pp 22-23).

1718
Painting by Thomas Murray, three-quarter-length standing, right hand on hip. Trinity College, Cambridge (M. Keynes, The Iconography of Sir Isaac Newton to 1800, VII-1, pp 23-24).

Ivory bust by David Le Marchand. British Museum (MLA 1765, 6-29; C. Avery, David le Marchand 1674-1726, 1996, no.68; A. Dawson, Portrait Sculpture, A catalogue of the British Museum collection c.1675-1975, 1999, no.57; M. Keynes, The Iconography of Sir Isaac Newton to 1800, 2005, A.2, pp 72-73); see Le Marchand NPG 6142. Formerly paired with a bust of Locke (C. Avery, David le Marchand 1674-1726, 1996, no.69). In the Art Gallery of Ontario are two further pairs, probably dating from 1720-25: the first, with slight differences, attributed to Le Marchand (C. Avery, David le Marchand 1674-1726, 1996, no.69b; M. Keynes, The Iconography of Sir Isaac Newton to 1800, 2005, A.4, p 73), the second, after Le Marchand, more resembling the prime models (C. Avery, David le Marchand 1674-1726, 1996, no.69d; M. Keynes, The Iconography of Sir Isaac Newton to 1800, 2005, A.5, p 77).

1719
Painting by Godfrey Kneller, three-quarter-length seated to right looking up left, signed and dated. Private collection, from Shirburn Castle (M. Keynes, The Iconography of Sir Isaac Newton to 1800, 2005, VIII-1, pp 24-25). A studio replica on the London art market 2004 (M. Keynes, The Iconography of Sir Isaac Newton to 1800, 2005, VIII-2, p 25). Bust-length pencil copies by Jonathan Richardson are in the British Museum (G.g-01-483; M. Keynes, The Iconography of Sir Isaac Newton to 1800, 2005, VIII-3, p 25), and the Ashmolean Museum (WA 1993.40; M. Keynes, The Iconography of Sir Isaac Newton to 1800, 2005, XIII-8).

1720
Painting by Godfrey Kneller, three-quarter-length seated, right hand holding gloves in his lap, signed and dated. Petworth (cat. 1920, p 66, no.153; J. D. Stewart, Godfrey Kneller, 1983, no.530; P. Fara, Newton, the Making of a Genius, 2002, p 37; M. Keynes, The Iconography of Sir Isaac Newton to 1800, 2005, IX-1, pp 25-26). Studio replica in the Grantham Museum bearing signature and date 1721 (M. Keynes, The Iconography of Sir Isaac Newton to 1800, 2005, IX-2, p 26). In 1720 Newton had commissioned his portrait by Kneller for the French scientist Pierre Varignon.

c.1720
Drawings by William Stukeley who wrote ‘I have taken several sketches from his [Newton’s] side face, which are very like him’ (to Conduitt, 22 July 1727; see J. D. Stewart, Godfrey Kneller, 1983, p 71 and n62).

1725
Painting by John Vanderbank, three-quarter-length seated to right, with his own short white hair, left hand in lap, signed and dated. Royal Society, London (N. H. Robinson, The Royal Society Catalogue of Portraits, 1980, pp 226-27, illus.; P. Fara, Newton, the Making of a Genius, 2002, pp 31-32; M. Keynes, The Iconography of Sir Isaac Newton to 1800, 2005, XIII-2, p 30). Engraved J. Faber II 1726 (J. Chaloner Smith, British Mezzotinto Portraits, 257; M. Keynes, The Iconography of Sir Isaac Newton to 1800, 2005, XLVIII, p 58). A replica in Trinity College, Cambridge, presented by Robert Smith 1766 (M. Keynes, The Iconography of Sir Isaac Newton to 1800, 2005, XIII-3, p 31).
An oil sketch on paper of the head, with the Royal Society (N. H. Robinson, The Royal Society Catalogue of Portraits, 1980, pp 224-25, illus.; M. Keynes, The Iconography of Sir Isaac Newton to 1800, 2005, XIII-1, p 30), purchased 1950, has been identified as a study by Vanderbank but may be derivative.
Other bust-length versions include those at the Royal Astronomical Society, London, and the Royal Military Academy, Sandhurst (M. Keynes, The Iconography of Sir Isaac Newton to 1800, 2005, XIII-5 & 6, p 32).

1726
Painting by John Vanderbank, three-quarter-length seated, left hand supporting a book in his lap, signed and dated. Royal Society, London, presented by Martin Folkes (N. H. Robinson, The Royal Society Catalogue of Portraits, 1980, pp 222-23, illus.; M. Keynes, The Iconography of Sir Isaac Newton to 1800, 2005, XV-1, pp 36-37). Engraved J. Faber II 1727 (J. Chaloner Smith, British Mezzotinto Portraits, 258; M. Keynes, The Iconography of Sir Isaac Newton to 1800, 2005, L, p 59).

c.1726-30
Painting by Enoch Seeman, see NPG 558.

Posthumous Images to c.1760
Posthumous medals include those by John Croker 1731 (Medallic Illustrations of The History of Great Britain and Ireland, British Museum, 1911, cxlvii/4; M. Keynes, The Iconography of Sir Isaac Newton to 1800, 2005, G.1, p 112); Jacques Roettiers 1739 (Medallic Illustrations of The History of Great Britain and Ireland, British Museum, 1911, cxlvii/7; M. Keynes, The Iconography of Sir Isaac Newton to 1800, 2005, G.4, p 113) and Jean Dassier perhaps c.1752 (Medallic Illustrations of The History of Great Britain and Ireland, British Museum, 1911, clxvii/5 & 6; M. Keynes, The Iconography of Sir Isaac Newton to 1800, 2005, G.2, 3, p 112; W. Eisler, The Dassiers of Geneva: Jean Dassier, 2002, pp 268-69, nos. 8, 9, illus. 286).

c.1727-29
Stone bust by J. M. Rysbrack, with open tunic and drape. Stowe, Temple of British Worthies (illus. Stowe Landscape Gardens, National Trust, 1997, p 29; Apollo, CXLVIII, July 1998, p 33 as c.1726, but more probably posthumous; M. Keynes, The Iconography of Sir Isaac Newton to 1800, 2005, A.12, pp 81-82).

Marble laureate bust by J. M. Rysbrack. Earl of Portsmouth, commissioned by John Conduitt (M. Keynes, The Iconography of Sir Isaac Newton to 1800, 2005, A.10, p 80). Copies in marble in the Government Art Collection (16051; M. Keynes, The Iconography of Sir Isaac Newton to 1800, 2005, A.13, p 82); in bronze, Trinity College, Cambridge, lent to the Fitzwilliam Museum (from Rysbrack’s sale; M. Keynes, The Iconography of Sir Isaac Newton to 1800, 2005, A.15, pp 82-83); plasters in the Wren Library, Trinity College, Cambridge, inscribed 1739 (Webb 1952, p 216, as terra cotta; M. Keynes, The Iconography of Sir Isaac Newton to 1800, 2005, A.14, p 82), and in the British Museum (MLA SL 1984; A. Dawson, Portrait Sculpture, A catalogue of the British Museum collection c.1675-1975, 1999, no.58; M. Keynes, The Iconography of Sir Isaac Newton to 1800, 2005, A.16, p 83). Reduced copies by John Cheere at West Wycombe (M. Keynes, The Iconography of Sir Isaac Newton to 1800, 2005, A.34, p 91) and the Yale Center for British Art (B1977.14.5; M. Keynes, The Iconography of Sir Isaac Newton to 1800, 2005, A.35, p 91) see T. Friedman & T. Clifford, The Man at Hyde Park Corner, exhibition catalogue, Temple Newsam, Leeds, and Marble Hill, Twickenham, 1974, no.97.

after 1727
Relief medallion by Laurent Delvaux. musée communal d’archéologie, Nivelles (plaster). Versions in the musées Royaux d’Art et d’Histoire, Brussels (terracotta); musée de Groesbeeck-de Croix, Namur (marble); Spalding Gentlemen’s Society (marble). See M. Keynes, The Iconography of Sir Isaac Newton to 1800, 2005, B.16-20, pp 95-96.

before 1729
Wax oval relief by Matthew Gosset, bust-length. Spalding Gentlemen’s Society. For further wax medallions see E. J. Pyke, A Biographical Dictionary of Wax Modellers, 1973; and M. Keynes, The Iconography of Sir Isaac Newton to 1800, 2005, pp 109-10.

c.1730?
Marble bust attributed to Peter Scheemakers. Mansion House, Louth, from the Naturalists’ Antiquarian and Literary Society and David Garrick (M. Keynes, The Iconography of Sir Isaac Newton to 1800, 2005, A.30, pp 88-89). A later version at Alscot Park has been dated c.1760 (M. Keynes, The Iconography of Sir Isaac Newton to 1800, 2005, A.31, pp 89-90). A cast of Newton by Scheemakers was auctioned on 6 June 1771, lot 21 (I. Roscoe, ‘Peter Scheemakers’, Wal. Soc., LXI, 1999, no.315).

1731
Reclining whole-length marble figure by J. M. Rysbrack in the Newton monument. Westminster Abbey (M. Whinney, Sculpture in Britain 1530 to 1830, 1964, pls 64, 65; P. Fara, Newton, the Making of a Genius, 2002, pp 41-42; M. Keynes, The Iconography of Sir Isaac Newton to 1800, 2005, D.5, pp 98-100). A terracotta modello by Rysbrack for this figure in the Victoria and Albert Museum (A.1-1938; D. Bilbey, British Sculpture 1470-2000, a concise catalogue of the collection at the Victoria and Albert Museum, 2002, no.184; M. Keynes, The Iconography of Sir Isaac Newton to 1800, 2005, D.4, p 98).

1732
Marble bust by Giovanni Battista Guelfi. Scone Palace, from Alexander Pope’s collection (M. Keynes, The Iconography of Sir Isaac Newton to 1800, 2005, A.8, pp 78-79). A copy in marble by Michael Rysbrack is in the Royal Collection, made for Queen Caroline’s Grotto at Richmond (M. Keynes, The Iconography of Sir Isaac Newton to 1800, 2005, A.9, p 79). See C. Giometti, Sculpture Jnl., III, 1999, pp 38-39.

1735
Painting by Valentine Ritz, dated, a whole-length elaboration of the Thornhill pattern of c.1712. Trinity College, Cambridge, presented by Samuel Knight in 1752 (M. Keynes, The Iconography of Sir Isaac Newton to 1800, 2005, IV-5, pp 20-21).

Undated [c.1735?]
Painting by Thomas Hudson, whole-length seated, left arm resting on table, an open book behind him, signed. Trinity College, Cambridge (M. Keynes, The Iconography of Sir Isaac Newton to 1800, 2005, XIX-1, p 41). The head much resembling that in NPG 2881.

1738
Marble bust by L.-F. Roubiliac, all’antica. Royal Society, London, acquired in 1738, probably from John Conduitt (N. H. Robinson, The Royal Society Catalogue of Portraits, 1980, p 229, illus.; M. Keynes, The Iconography of Sir Isaac Newton to 1800, 2005, A.19, p 85). Versions at Trinity College, Dublin, installed by 1749 (A. Crookshank & D. Webb, Paintings and Sculptures in Trinity College, Dublin, 1990, p 152, illus.; M. Baker, ‘The making of portrait busts in the mid-eighteenth century: Roubiliac, Scheemakers and Trinity College, Dublin’, Burlington Magazine, CXXXVII, 1995, p 822, fig.39, as attributed to Roubiliac; M. Keynes, The Iconography of Sir Isaac Newton to 1800, 2005, A.23, p 86); Wren Library, Trinity College, Cambridge, signed and dated 1751, given by Daniel Lock (M. Baker, ‘The Portrait Sculpture’ in D. McKetterick ed., The Making of the Wren Library, Trinity College, Cambridge, 1995, p 133, no.2; M. Keynes, The Iconography of Sir Isaac Newton to 1800, 2005, A.24, p 87), and with the Royal Astronomical Society, London (M. Keynes, The Iconography of Sir Isaac Newton to 1800, 2005, A.25, p 87).

A terracotta from the Royal Observatory, Greenwich, now on loan to the National Maritime Museum (M. Baker, ‘The Portrait Sculpture’ in D. McKetterick ed., The Making of the Wren Library, Trinity College, Cambridge, 1995, pl.82; M. Keynes, The Iconography of Sir Isaac Newton to 1800, 2005, A.18, p 84), believed to have been made ‘under the Eyes of Mr Conduitt and several of Sir Isaac’s particular friends’. Plasters at Wilton (M. Keynes, The Iconography of Sir Isaac Newton to 1800, 2005, A.26, pp 87-88), with the Institute of Astronomy, Cambridge (M. Keynes, The Iconography of Sir Isaac Newton to 1800, 2005, A.27, p 88) and in the Athenaeum (H. Tait & R. Walker, The Athenaeum Collection, 2000, no.628), see NPG 995.

In 1864 the NPG bought at Christie’s, 17 March, lot 40, a related terracotta, found on inspection to be solid plaster and returned to the vendor (M. Keynes, The Iconography of Sir Isaac Newton to 1800, 2005, A.20, p 85).

A reduced bronze version, Christie’s, 5 July 1994, lot 121 (M. Keynes, The Iconography of Sir Isaac Newton to 1800, 2005, A.28, p 88). Reduced plaster copies by John Cheere at the Royal Institution; West Wycombe, and Aston Hall (M. Keynes, The Iconography of Sir Isaac Newton to 1800, 2005, A.36-38, pp 91-92).

A marble variant with differing drapery in the collection of Jacob, Lord Rothschild (M. Keynes, The Iconography of Sir Isaac Newton to 1800, 2005, A.22, p 86).

c.1739
Ivory relief attributed to Alexander van der Hagen. Keynes Library, King’s College, Cambridge (M. Keynes, The Iconography of Sir Isaac Newton to 1800, 2005, B.4, p 93). Versions (M. Keynes, The Iconography of Sir Isaac Newton to 1800, 2005, B.5-9, pp 93-94) with the Royal Society, London; Walters Art Gallery, Baltimore; the Victoria and Albert Museum (A.112-1929); Grace K. Babson collection, Babson Park, on loan to the Burndy Library, Dibner Institute MIT MA; Yale Center for British Art (B1977.14.9).

1749
Bronzed plaster statuette by John Cheere, his head resting on his left hand. York Art Gallery, from Kirkleatham (M. Keynes, The Iconography of Sir Isaac Newton to 1800, 2005, D.8, p 102; T. Friedman & T. Clifford, The Man at Hyde Park Corner, exhibition catalogue, Temple Newsam, Leeds, and Marble Hill, Twickenham, 1974, no.74, pl.26). Cheere listed Newton among his stock statues in a letter of 1754.

1751-55
Marble statue by L.-F. Roubiliac, a prism in his right hand. Trinity College, Cambridge, presented by Robert Smith 1755 (M. Whinney, Sculpture in Britain 1530 to 1830, 1964, pl.92; M. Baker, ‘The Portrait Sculpture’ in D. McKetterick ed., The Making of the Wren Library, Trinity College, Cambridge, 1995, p 136, no.1, pl.73; M. Keynes, The Iconography of Sir Isaac Newton to 1800, 2005, D.7, pp 101-02). Perhaps the finest of all Newton images (cf. F. Haskell, Past & Present in Art & Taste, 1987, p 15), but an idealised concept. The figure reproduced in the Royal Society medal of 1838 (L. Brown, A Catalogue of British Historical Medals 1760-1960, The Reign of Queen Victoria, 1987, no.1885).

1762
Marble bust by Joseph Wilton all’antica, dated. Bodleian Library (Mrs R. L. Poole, Catalogue of Portraits in the possession of the University, Colleges, City and County of Oxford, I, p 91, no.227; Catalogue of Portraits in the Bodleian Library by Mrs R. L. Poole completely revised and expanded by K. Garlick, 2004, p 235; M. Keynes, The Iconography of Sir Isaac Newton to 1800, 2005, A.32, p 90). Described in the Bodleian Day Book 1762 as ‘said to be based on an original portrait by Enoch Seeman’. An unidentified ‘bust; a model’ by Wilton was exhibited Society of Artists, London, 1768, no.159, and another appeared in Wilton’s sale, Christie’s, 2 June 1779, possibly that sold Christie’s, 2 July 1991, lot 81 (M. Keynes, The Iconography of Sir Isaac Newton to 1800, 2005, A.33, p 90).

Posthumous Images 1762-1800 include:
Marble bust by J. F. Nollekens c.1771 in the Salisbury and South Wiltshire Museum (M. Keynes, The Iconography of Sir Isaac Newton to 1800, 2005, A.29, p 88). Between c.1772-80 Wedgwood produced four medallions after Le Marchand from models supplied by William Hackwood (R. Reilly & G. Savage, Wedgwood, the Portrait Medallions, 1973, pp 257-59; M. Keynes, The Iconography of Sir Isaac Newton to 1800, 2005, E.1, 2, 7, pp 104-06), and three busts derived from John Cheere (see under c.1732 above; R. Reilly, Wedgwood, 1989, I, pp 454, 457; II, pp 750-51; M. Keynes, The Iconography of Sir Isaac Newton to 1800, 2005, E.8-11, pp 106-08). Between 1778 and 1791 fourteen paste medallions were produced by James Tassie (R. E. Raspe, Descriptive Catalogue … of coloured pastes, white enamel, and sulphur, by James Tassie, 1791, nos. 14312-24 and 15780; M. Keynes, The Iconography of Sir Isaac Newton to 1800, 2005, F.5-8, p 111). Statuettes of two sizes, a medallion and busts of four sizes by Charles Harris were offered from stock c.1790 (Catalogue of Statues, Bas Reliefs, Bustos, &c. of Charles Harris, statuary, Opposite to the new Church in the Strand, LONDON, n.d.).

Painting by George Romney 1794, ‘displaying the prism’ (M. Keynes, The Iconography of Sir Isaac Newton to 1800, 2005, XXX, pp 48-49); exhibited Romney, Kenwood, 1961, no.38, lent Mrs Chamberlayne-Macdonald (Newton died at Cranbury Park, home of the Chamberlayne family).

Monotype by William Blake 1795-c.1805, showing Newton measuring the Holy Trinity; Tate Gallery (NO5058; M. Keynes, The Iconography of Sir Isaac Newton to 1800, 2005, XXXI, pp 49-50).

Posthumous Images post-1800
The many 19th-century busts and statues include those by:
E. H. Baily of 1828 and 1849 (see NPG 995); William Jackson, Edwin Gahagan and William Beattie (exhibited in Westminster Hall in 1844); C. A. Rivers (RA 1845, no.1372); William Theed 1857 (New College, Oxford), and the commissioned statue for Grantham 1859, see P. Fara, Newton, the Making of a Genius, 2002, pp 242-45, fig.8.3; Giovanni Strazza c.1860 (Alnwick Castle); Alexander Munro 1863 (Oxford University Museum, see P. Fara, Newton, the Making of a Genius, 2002, p 245); John Bell (Society of British Artists, 1865, no.1031); Joseph Durham (RA 1869, no.1200, and for Burlington House); W. C. Marshall 1874 (Leicester Square; now defaced through intemperate cleaning); J. Daymond & Son 1882 (City of London School); J. J. Millson 1894 (Oldham Public Library); Robert Bridgeman 1895-97 (John Rylands Library, Manchester), and Cyrus E. Dallin 1897 (Library of Congress, Washington DC).
Such a selective list might close with references to those figures by Salvador Dali 1987, ‘Newton the man is gone, while Newton’s law is demonstrated to us voicelessly and permanently’ (Christie’s, 3 December 1996, lot 337; P. Fara, Newton, the Making of a Genius, 2002, p 256), and the ‘Master of the Universe’ by Eduardo Paolozzi 1989-94 (P. Fara, Newton, the Making of a Genius, 2002, pp 269-70), derived from the Blake monotype of 1795-c.1805; a model of 1989 is in the Scottish National Gallery of Modern Art and the bronze of 1994 stands outside the British Library, London.

History
A painted allegory by G. B. Pittoni and Domenico and Giuseppe Valeriani was one of a series of ‘monuments’ to recent ‘British Worthies, who were bright and shining Ornaments, to their Country’, commissioned by Owen MacSwinny c.1725-29. Fitzwilliam Museum (PD.52-1973), lent to Trinity College, Cambridge, since 2001 (E. Croft-Murray, Decorative Painting in England, II, The Eighteenth and Nineteenth Centuries, 1970, p 242, no.22; M. Keynes, The Iconography of Sir Isaac Newton to 1800, 2005, D.9, pp 102-03).

A second allegory by G. B. Pittoni, after 1731, in the Marzotto collection, Valdagno (M. Keynes, The Iconography of Sir Isaac Newton to 1800, 2005, D.10, p 103).



This extended catalogue entry is from the National Portrait Gallery collection catalogue: John Ingamells, National Portrait Gallery: Later Stuart Portraits 1685-1714, National Portrait Gallery, 2009, and is as published then. For the most up-to-date details on individual Collection works, we recommend reading the information provided in the Search the Collection results on this website in parallel with this text.