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Elizabeth Hamilton, Countess de Gramont

© National Portrait Gallery, London

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Elizabeth Hamilton, Countess de Gramont

by John Giles Eccardt, after Sir Peter Lely
oil on canvas, 18th century, based on a work of circa 1663
30 in. x 24 1/2 in. (762 mm x 622 mm) oval
Purchased, 1857
Primary Collection
NPG 20

On display at Strawberry Hill Trust, Twickenham

Sitterback to top

Artistsback to top

  • John Giles Eccardt (active 1740-died 1779), Portrait painter. Artist associated with 21 portraits.
  • Sir Peter Lely (1618-1680), Portrait painter. Artist associated with 842 portraits, Sitter in 19 portraits.

Linked publicationsback to top

  • 100 Pioneering Women, p. 7
  • The Masque of Beauty, 1972 (accompanying the exhibition at the National Portrait Gallery from National Portrait Gallery, London, 5 July-17 Sept. 1972.), p. number 13
  • Piper, David, Catalogue of Seventeenth Century Portraits in the National Portrait Gallery, 1625-1714, 1963, p. 146
  • Saywell, David; Simon, Jacob, Complete Illustrated Catalogue, 2004, p. 258

Events of 1663back to top

Current affairs

Gilbert Sheldon is enthroned as Archbishop of Canterbury upon the death of William Juxon. Sheldon principle concerns would be defence of the church, coupled with religious uniformity and ecclesiastical reform.
England experiences a very cold, wet summer, as noted by Samuel Pepys in his diary.

Art and science

John Dryden's first play, The Wild Gallant, is staged at court probably through the influence of Barbara Palmer, Countess of Castlemaine, the king's mistress.

International

A renewal of the English colonisation of North America is marked by a royal charter naming eight aristocrats joint owners of a projected colony in Carolina. Known as the Lords Proprietors of Carolina, they are informally led by Anthony Ashley-Cooper, Earl of Shaftesbury.

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